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Here is the situation, I really don't know what is really going on when adding big number to each other to calculate all the average at the end.

Please correct me if there is a specific error to edit.

I have debugged and I'm just finding in data, my normal data in the following loop but it seems that the variable "somme"gives me sometines some random numbers and gives something totally wrong. The same for "moyenne"

Something else, all data are, or 0 or a positive number. Somme gives sometimes a negative number!

#define Nb 230400
std::vector<std::array<double,480>> data(480);

    double somme=0;
    double moyenne=0;
    for (int i=0;i<480;i++)
    {
        for (int j=0;j<480;j++)
            somme=somme+data[i][j];

    }
    moyenne=somme/Nb;
share|improve this question
    
Seems like you're overflowing the somme variable. You can calculate moyenne directly with moyenne=moyenne+data[i][j]/Nb;. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 9 '13 at 8:49
    
How do you know? –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 8:50
    
Probably because your sum gets too large? Look into a bignum library like GMP. –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 9 '13 at 8:50
1  
@LuchianGrigore (and others): if he's on a PC or a typical Unix system, overflow should result in infinity, not some negative number. (But we need more information concerning his environment, and the constraints on values in data.) –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 8:54
1  
@jogojapan Which is a good point. vector will null its elements if he constructs the vector with the actual dimensions from the start. If he's used push_back, on the other hand, vector will only copy the std::array that it's given, which may not have been initialized. –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, with the code you've given, there is no way you can get negative results (at least with the IEEE floating point used on PCs and the usual Unix machines); if you overflow, you will get the special value Inf (but you cannot overflow if the data are in the ranges you specify). The results may be wrong, due to rounding errors, but they will still have a lower bound of 0.

You haven't specified how you determined that the results were negative, nor how you ensure that the input data is in range, so I can only speculate; but the following are distinct possibilities:

  • You compiled with optimization turned on, and you are looking at the values with the debugger. The debugger will often show wrong values (uninitialized memory) when looking at optimized code.
  • You have undefined behavior (a pointer problem) elsewhere, which corrupts the memory you're looking at here. 99% of the time, this is the explination of otherwise unexplainable behavior, but I'm somewhat dubious here: provided there is nothing else in the code sequence you posted, and there are no other threads running, there are no pointers (at least that you manipulate) to misuse.
  • You failed to properly initialize the data. You might want to add an assert in the innermost loop, just to be sure:
        for ( int i = 0; i < 480; ++ i ) {
            for ( int j = 0; j < 480; ++ j ) {
                assert( data[i][j] >= 0.0 && data[i][j] < 200000.0 );
                somme += data[i][j];
            }
        }
    

For the rest, your algorithm isn't particularly accurate. Some quick tests (filling your data structure with random values in the range [0...2e5)) show less than 15 digits accuracy in the final result. (Of course, this may be acceptable. Most physical data that you acquire won't have more than 3 or 4 digits accuracy anyway, and you may not be displaying more than 6. In which case...)

The accuracy issue is actually curious, and shows just how tricky these things can be. I used three functions for my tests:

//  Basically what you did...
double
av1( std::vector<std::array<double, cols>> const& data )
{
    double somme = 0.0;
    for ( int i = 0; i != data.size(); ++ i ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j != cols; ++j ) {
            somme += data[i][j];
        }
    }
    return somme / (data.size() * cols);
}

//  The natural way of writing it in C++11...
double
av2( std::vector<std::array<double, cols>> const& data )
{
    return std::accumulate( 
        data.begin(),
        data.end(),
        0.0,
        []( double a, std::array<double, cols> const& b ) {
            return a + std::accumulate( b.begin(), b.end(), 0.0 );
        } ) / (data.size() * cols);
}

//  Using the Kahan summation algorithm...
double
av3( std::vector<std::array<double, cols>> const& data )
{
    double somme = 0.0;
    double c = 0.0;
    for ( int i = 0; i != data.size(); ++ i ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j != cols; ++j ) {
            double y = data[i][j] - c;
            double t = somme + y;
            c = (t - somme) - y;
            somme = t;
        }
    }
    return somme / (data.size() * cols);
}

(In all of the tests, cols == 480 and data.size() == 480.)

The code was compiled using VC11, with option /O2. The interesting thing was that av2 was systematically more accurate than your code, usually down to the 17th digit (2 or 3 bits in the internal representation), where as av1 was often off as much as 2 or 3 in the 15th digit (8 or 9 bits in the internal representation). The reason for this is that your code systematically collects into xmm1, accross all 480*480 values, where as av2 collects each row separately; this results in less additions with a large difference of magnitude. (As av1 approaches the end of the data, somme approaches 2.3e10, which is significantly larger than any of the data elements.) Using something like:

double
moyenne( std::vector<std::array<double, cols>> const& data )
{
    double outerSum = 0.0;
    for ( int i = 0; i != data.size(); ++ i ) {
        double innerSum = 0.0;
        for ( int j = 0; j != cols; ++ j ) {
            innerSum += data[i][j];
        }
        outerSum += innerSum;
    }
    return outerSum / (data.size() * cols);
}

should give results equivalent to av2. (But if you need the accuracy, you really should go with the Kahan summing algorithm.)

(I'm tempted to add that if any of this surprises you, you shouldn't be using floating point anyway.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for it. Useful information –  MelMed Jul 9 '13 at 11:48
    
+1 for completenes and analysis of accuracy. –  urzeit Jul 9 '13 at 14:07

It's possible that a data overflow happened. The overflow changed the sign bit so it looks like a negative number. Try "long double" instead of "double" if you're dealing with really big numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
They are really big for me, the range can be from 0 to 100K. –  MelMed Jul 9 '13 at 8:58
    
The same , it doesn; t work. –  MelMed Jul 9 '13 at 9:03
1  
First, this answer describes the behavior of integral types, not floating point. For floating point (at least on most modern machines), overflow returns a special value Inf. Second, precision may be an issue, and you might want to look into the Kahan algorithm. Once you get this working, however: given the code you've show, it is impossible for you to obtain a negative results unless some of the data is negative. So there is something wrong elsewhere. –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 9:09
1  
@Manas Adding 100000.0 to 1e-40 is going to seriously loose accuracy. (But it still won't cause a negative result.) –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 9:10
1  
@MelMed Obviously, we don't want to manually look at the values. In order to analyze your problem, however, we need to be able to reproduce it. Where do the values come from? How do they get into the vector<array>? How can we easily simulate them? –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 9:18

This may also be caused by floating point errors. The floating point error can be really large if you add numbers in different dimensions (such as 10e-10 + 10) while the error is smaller if the dimensions are similar.

If all numbers are large, your code should work (if there is no overflow). If not, you may increase accuracy if you add the numbers sorted. Pseudocode:

array a;
sort(a);
foreach i in a:
    somme += i
somme /= count(a)

The reason is, that the smallest numbers summed up may be of a more similar dimension like the next bigger number. This way the error gets smaller.

To avoid overflows you may devide each i by count(a) instead of deviding the result. This should not change the accuracy if no overflow happens.

PS: If you sort the array descending or reverse the loop you can maximize your error!

share|improve this answer
    
Whether the numbers are large or not is irrelevant. The important issue is that they all have more or less the same magnitude. If so, the rounding errors f0r 230400 doubles shouldn't be too bad. If they are, of course, I should use the Kahan algorithm for summing---sorting may help, but it's far from guaranteed. –  James Kanze Jul 9 '13 at 8:56
    
@James Kanze: That is exactly what I tried to express. –  urzeit Jul 9 '13 at 8:58

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