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I have the below content that loads on through AJAX.

<div class="grid">
    <div class="thumb">
        <img alt="AlbumIcon" src="some-image.jpg">
        <div style="bottom:-75px;" class="meta">
            <p class="title">Title</p>
            <p class="genre"> <i class="icon-film icon-white"></i>
                Genre
            </p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Additionally, I have writen the following script in jquery that applies to the above 'div.grid'.

 jQuery(function ($) {

    $(document).ready(function () {
        $(".grid").on({
            mouseenter : function () {
                $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                    bottom:'0px'
                },200);
            },

            mouseleave : function () {
                $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                    bottom:'-75px'
                },200);
            }
        });   
     });  
  });

The script works fine when the page loads the first time. However, the hover effect doesn't work once the above div is generated via AJAX after clicking on an 'a' tag. I can't seem to figure out what's wrong here? New to all this. Can anyone help?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

To append these event handlers to dynamically generated elements, you need to bind to the document or another static parent element and then specify .grid as the second argument passed to .on.

The second argument is used as a filter to determine the selected elements that trigger the event. So when the event is fired it will propagate to the document or parent element selected by jquery. The event target will then be scrutinized using the selector provided as the second argument. If the target matches the second argument, (.grid in our case), the event is fired.

You can read more in the jQuery documentation.

Also, since your using document.ready there is no need for the short hand ready statement, jquery(function($).

 $(document).ready(function () {
    $(document).on({
                mouseenter : function () {
                    $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                        bottom:'0px'
                    },200);
                },

                mouseleave : function () {
                    $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                        bottom:'-75px'
                    },200);
                }
            }, ".grid");   
     });  
share|improve this answer
    
@SunnyD I tried to give a better description, describing how propagation is handled. Basically these events bubble up to the element we selected with jquery and then the target(element firing event) is inspected. – Kevin Bowersox Jul 9 '13 at 9:35
    
@SunnyD does that explanation help? Any further questions? – Kevin Bowersox Jul 9 '13 at 9:36
    
Thanks Kevin, it all made sense after reading it repeatedly. – SunnyD Jul 9 '13 at 9:39
    
@SunnyD the documentation will explain it 10x better than me – Kevin Bowersox Jul 9 '13 at 9:41

you lost your binding because of ajax that overwrite your div with class=".grid" use parent element for binding

$('.ParentElementClass').on("mouseleave", ".grid", function(){...})

more from jquery api

Delegated events have the advantage that they can process events from descendant elements that are added to the document at a later time. By picking an element that is guaranteed to be present at the time the delegated event handler is attached, you can use delegated events to avoid the need to frequently attach and remove event handlers. This element could be the container element of a view in a Model-View-Controller design, for example, or document if the event handler wants to monitor all bubbling events in the document. The document element is available in the head of the document before loading any other HTML, so it is safe to attach events there without waiting for the document to be ready.

share|improve this answer

Not sure what you're shooting for here but a little malformed HTML may have done it...

jsFiddle Demo

<div class="grid">
    <div class="thumb">
        <img alt="AlbumIcon" src="some-image.jpg" />
        <div style="bottom:-75px;" class="meta">
            <p class="title">Title</p>
            <p class="genre"><i class="icon-film icon-white"></i>Genre</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
     $(function () {
         $(".grid").on({
             mouseenter: function () {
                 alert('entered');
                 $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                     bottom: '0px'
                 }, 200);
             },

             mouseleave: function () {
                 alert('left');
                 $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                     bottom: '-75px'
                 }, 200);
             }
         }, ".thumb");
     });
 });

Be sure to close img tags. They're notorious for causing intermittent glitches.

share|improve this answer

You can just use the hover function:

jQuery(function ($) {

$(document).ready(function () {
    $(".grid").hover(function () { /*mouseenter*/
            $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                bottom:'0px'
            },200);
        },function(){ /*mouseleave*/
            $(this).find('.meta').stop().animate({
                bottom:'-75px'
            },200);
        }
    });   
});

Explanation:

The first parameter function does the work of mouseenter and the second does the work of mouseleave.

I'd recommend using those both, mouseenter and mouseleave in situation when you don't want an effect back when the user gets off his mouse from the element.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I did try using hover, but it never worked then. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the above code will only work on a page load and not on AJAX invoked HTML. – SunnyD Jul 9 '13 at 9:45

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