Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a convenient way of filling na values with (the first) values of an array or column?

Imagine the following DataFrame:

dfcolors = pd.DataFrame({'Colors': ['Blue', 'Red', np.nan, 'Green', np.nan, np.nan, 'Brown']})

  Colors
0   Blue
1    Red
2    NaN
3  Green
4    NaN
5    NaN
6  Brown

I want to fill the NaN values with values from another DataFrame, or array, so:

dfalt = pd.DataFrame({'Alt': ['Cyan', 'Pink']})

           Alt
0         Cyan
1         Pink

When there are more NaN's then fill values some NaN's should remain. And when there are more fill values, not all of them will be used. So we'll have to do some counting:

n_missing = len(dfcolors) - dfcolors.count().values[0]    
n_fill = min(n_missing, len(dfalt))

The number n_fill is the amount of values that can be filled.

Selecting the NaN values which can/should be filled can be done with:

dfcolors.Colors[pd.isnull(dfcolors.Colors)][:n_fill]

2    NaN
4    NaN
Name: Colors, dtype: object

Selecting the fill values

dfalt.Alt[:n_fill]

0    Cyan
1    Pink
Name: Alt, dtype: object

And them i'm stuck at something like:

dfcolors.Colors[pd.isnull(dfcolors.Colors)][:n_fill] = dfalt.Alt[:n_fill]

Which doesn't work... Any tips would be great.

This is the output that i want:

  Colors
0   Blue
1    Red
2   Cyan
3  Green
4   Pink
5    NaN
6  Brown

NaN values are filled from top to bottom, and the fill values are also selected from top to bottom if there are more fill values than NaN's

share|improve this question
1  
What is the output you want? –  Andy Hayden Jul 9 '13 at 9:36
    
Good point, i edited the question a bit. –  Rutger Kassies Jul 9 '13 at 9:55
    
It's returning view vs copy (fancy indexing always returns a copy)... hmm –  Andy Hayden Jul 9 '13 at 10:00
    
Yes I think thats a main issue, I have tried all kinds of things like adding .values or even wrapping it in a new DataFrame. No luck so far. –  Rutger Kassies Jul 9 '13 at 10:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is rather awful, but iterating over the index of the nulls works:

In [11]: nulls = dfcolors[pd.isnull(dfcolors['Colors'])]

In [12]: for i, ni in enumerate(nulls.index[:len(dfalt)]):
             dfcolors['Colors'].loc[ni] = dfalt['Alt'].iloc[i]

In [13]: dfcolors
Out[13]:
  Colors
0   Blue
1    Red
2   Cyan
3  Green
4   Pink
5    NaN
6  Brown
share|improve this answer

You could use a generator. That way you could write something like this:

import pandas as pd
from pandas import np

dfcolors = pd.DataFrame({'Colors': ['Blue', 'Red', np.nan, 'Green', np.nan, np.nan, 'Brown']})
dfalt = pd.DataFrame({'Alt': ['Cyan', 'Pink']})

gen_alt = (alt for alt in dfalt.Alt)

for i, color in enumerate(dfcolors.Colors):
    if not pd.isnull(color): continue
    try:
        dfcolors.Colors[i] = gen_alt.next()
    except StopIteration:
        break
print(dfcolors)
#     Colors
# 0   Blue
# 1    Red
# 2   Cyan
# 3  Green
# 4   Pink
# 5    NaN
# 6  Brown
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.