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I'm developing an AngularJS application with a RoR backend and ran into an issue when using multiple layouts. The application uses one layout when rendering pages to an unauthenticated user, and changes to another layout once the user is authenticated.

The layout is server on the initial pageload, and is managed by Rails. Some sample code illustrating how we're loading the different layouts based on the route:

class SampleController < ApplicationController
  layout :current_layout

  def current_layout
    "layout" unless request.xhr?
  end
end

Sample controller for different section:

class SampleController2 < ApplicationController
  layout :current_layout

  def current_layout
    "anotherLayout" unless request.xhr?
  end
end

This is defined separately for the controllers managing the authenticated/unauthenticated users, and basically serves up the proper layout. We're using a XHR check to prevent routing loops when Angular comes into picture.

So this works fine in most browser, but breaks when using IE9. Angular falls back to using #! URLs in IE9, so Rails has no idea which controller to load since the hash doesn't get sent to the backend. In this case, Rails loads the root and it's associated layout. If the authenticated section is set as the default, then it loads this layout even for unauthenticated users, and vice-versa.

So basically, I need to find a way to make this multiple layout application work properly even in browsers which don't support HTML5 pushState. I've checked all over the place for a proper solution for this and couldn't come up with anything yet.

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Do any of these options work for you? 1. Put the layout under AngularJS control (in the Angular templates). 2. Some apps change their root URL to render some other user-specific landing page once a user is logged in. This might solve your problem because logged-in users would get a different layout than logged-in users when they hit the root URL. –  colllin Jul 25 '13 at 22:06
    
@colllin 1. Based on my research, Angular doesn't have proper support for multiple layouts as of now. The closest thing I found was Angular-UI Router, but this kept reloading the entire page anyway. 2. In a perfect world, I'd have full control over this, but the client doesn't want the root URL changed in any way. –  godfrzero Jul 26 '13 at 13:05
    
I figured out a way to get it mostly working by tweaking the backend a bit. I'll post it as an answer once I get the time to type it up properly. –  godfrzero Jul 26 '13 at 13:06
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alright, so after testing lots of tweaks on both the client and server side, I ended up using the following solution. Basically, I just stopped exposing Angular to multiple layouts and dealt with that in Rails. Of course, this does put a limitation on users.

The app is divided into two main sections: dashboard and authentication. So in the backend, we restrict the users from accessing any authentication pages if they're logged in, and obviously dashboard pages can only be accessed if the user is authenticated.

The root of the problem was that Rails had no way of knowing which layout to serve, if a layout should be served at all. We used the cookies to differentiate the authenticated and unauthenticated users. If the cookie is set, and it passes the authenticity testing, then the dashboard layout should be loaded. Otherwise, any user trying to access the dashboard will be redirected to the authentication section:

class DashboardController < ApplicationController

  layout :current_layout

  before_filter :authenticate_user

  def authenticate_user
    if request.xhr? && !cookies[:access_token]
      redirect_to "/login"
    end
  end

  def current_layout
    if cookies[:access_token]
      "dashboard" unless request.xhr?
    else 
      "application" unless request.xhr?
    end
  end
end

Similarly for the authentication section:

class AuthenticationController < ApplicationController

  layout :current_layout

  before_filter :redirect_if_authenticated

  def redirect_if_authenticated
    if request.xhr? && cookies[:access_token]
      redirect_to "/dashboard"
    end
  end

  def current_layout
    if cookies[:access_token]
      "dashboard" unless request.xhr?
    else 
      "application" unless request.xhr?
    end
  end
end

So main points to note here:

  • If the request is an XHR, don't serve the layout again. Serving the layout again will cause infinite loading loops in IE9, possibly in other IE versions as well.

  • Since we're not getting the URL Fragment at the server side, we have no way of knowing which layout should be loaded. So we're using the cookies as the source of truth, and access is controlled solely based on this.

  • This introduces some asymmetry on the clientside: In some cases, the url and layout will remain if the user types in the URL for another section. Since we can't do anything based on the URL from the server, and since cookies remain unchanged in this case, this has to be handled by Angular.

For the last point, the authentication section in my case only had a few possible urls, so I just redirected if I got a regex match as follows:

if(Modernizr.history) {
    if(!/(login|sign|pass)/.test(location.pathname)) {
        $location.path('/');
    }
} else {
    if(location.hash.length > 3 && !/(login|sign|pass)/.test(location.hash)) {
        $window.location.href = '/';
    }
}

Checking for the history API here, because in older IE browsers(and I guess in other older ones as well?), $location.path('/') wasn't reloading the entire page consistently. When using this, the $routeProvider configuration should also conditionally load the layouts, for cases where we redirect to root /:

$routeProvider
// Code for routes
.otherwise({
  // Of course, add something to check access_token authenticity here as well :P
  redirectTo: $.cookie('access_token') ? "/dashboard" : "/login"
});

So, with these couple tweaks, the app is working properly in all browsers and functioning with multiple layouts. Of course, I know nothing about RoR, so I'm hoping someone is going to have a few improvements to suggest, or a better answer. ;)

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