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in Ruby it's easy to tell loop to go to next item

(1..10).each do |a|
  next if a.even?
  puts a
end

result =>

1
3   
5
7
9

but what if I need to call next from outside of the loop (e.g.: method)

def my_complex_method(item)
  next if item.even?  # this will obviously fail 
end

(1..10).each do |a|
  my_complex_method(a)
  puts a
end

only solution I found and works is to use throw & catch like in SO question How to break outer cycle in Ruby?

def my_complex_method(item)
  throw(:skip) if item.even? 
end

(1..10).each do |a|
  catch(:skip) do   
    my_complex_method(a)
    puts a
  end
end

My question is: anyone got any more niftier solution to do this ?? or is throw/catch only way to do this ??

Also what If I want to call my_complex_method not only as a part of that loop (=> don't throw :skip) , can I somehow tell my method it's called from a loop ?

share|improve this question
2  
You're really, really over thinking this. Return a value and invoke next conditionally based on the returned value. This is an incredibly common pattern in software, in virtually every language I've ever used. throw/catch have no place here. –  meagar Jul 9 '13 at 11:18
    
I agree that for this example it's ridiculous, but I have a case where I need separation of loop and method –  equivalent8 Jul 9 '13 at 12:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You complex method could return a boolean, and then you compare on your loop like this:

def my_complex_method(item)
  true if item.even? 
end

(1..10).each do |a|
  next if my_complex_method(a)
  puts a
end

A simple approach, but different from the try catch one.

UPDATE

As item.even? already return a boolean value, you don't need the true if item.even? part, you can do as follow:

def my_complex_method(item)
  item.even? 
end
share|improve this answer
    
I'll go with this answer because it made me realize that my_complex_method in my real code can be written different way so this can be achieved (as well as did Meagar comment on my question)... but if anyone ever need to use functionality as I described in my qestion I would go with Pritis answer rather than with my throw/catch solution –  equivalent8 Jul 10 '13 at 8:12

Enumerator#next and Enumerator#peek will be good option to goo :

def my_complex_method(e)
  return if e.peek.even? 
  p e.peek
end
enum = (1..5).each
enum.size.times do |a|
  my_complex_method(enum)
  enum.next
end

Output

1
3
5
share|improve this answer

If all you need is to take actions on only some of values, based on value returned by my_complex_method you could use enumerators wisely:

(1..10).map { |a| [a, my_complex_method(a)] }.each do |a, success|
  puts a if success
end
You could define method accepting block and take some action in this block based on success or failure there: (1..10).each do |a| my_complex_method { |success| next if success } end Thanks to scoping, you are able not to use `catch`/`throw`, and call `next` based on processing status.
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can tell the first method doesn't work - the next isn't passed through to each –  Frederick Cheung Jul 9 '13 at 11:41
    
Ah, you are right -- next here refers to yield defined in my_complex_method... –  samuil Jul 9 '13 at 11:47

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