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For every user I am fetching the names corresponding to that user and for each fetched name there is a corresponding List.

I have tried to replicate the sample using this below standalone program:

package com;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        List<String> users = new ArrayList<String>();
        users.add("user101");
        users.add("adminuser");

        for (String user : users) {
            try {
                ArrayList<String> namesCorrespondingtoUser = getNamesCorrespondingtoUser(user);
                for (String Id : namesCorrespondingtoUser) {

                    List<String> Items = getItemsCorrespondingtoId(user, Id);

                    filter(Items, user);
                }
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }
        }
    }

    public static ArrayList<String> getNamesCorrespondingtoUser(String userName)
            throws Exception {
        ArrayList<String> names = new ArrayList<String>();
        if (userName.equals("user101")) {
            names.add("UBSC1");
            names.add("HDBG1");
            names.add("GHYU1");
        }
        if (userName.equals("adminuser")) {
            names.add("UBSC1");
            names.add("HDBG1");
            names.add("GHYU1");
        }
        return names;

    }

    public static List<String> getItemsCorrespondingtoId(String userName,
            String Id) throws Exception {

        return null;
    }

    private static void filter(List<String> Items, String user) {

    }

}

I am worried as there is a for loop inside a for loop.

Please let me know if this can be improved in any way.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Raedwald, Andrew, ryan1234, madth3, Rubens Jul 10 '13 at 0:36

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Why are you worried? Nested loops are perfectly fine, and in your case, seem to be the right approach. –  Carsten Jul 9 '13 at 11:04
    
If you use Map(to store both id and user in same datastructure) here instead of using two lists then you can avoid this loop nesting.But this way is also fine in my opinion –  freak Jul 9 '13 at 11:06
1  
Perhaps, codereview.stackexchange.com is more appropriate for these questions? –  zEro Jul 9 '13 at 12:19
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about improving a working program. –  madth3 Jul 10 '13 at 0:33

3 Answers 3

I don't see any problem with the inner loop, because it will only be executed on rare occasions. In education you get sometime the feeling, that all that is worse than O(n * log(n)) is bad, but in the real world it is rarely the case that you get any problems with O(n²).

But there are a couple of other things you could try to improve.

1.: In ArrayList<String> getNamesCorrespondingtoUser(String userName) you depend on hard coded user names. It would be better to read/store the aliases somewhere, else you have to touch the code everytime a name changes.

2.: Throwing Exception is usually not a good idea, because it is the base class of all exceptions and you can't differentiate which Exceptions are actually thrown. It is hard to build any error handling upon that functions.

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2  
Worse that throwing Exception, is to catch an exception and not handle it. That's an invitation for silent failures. –  Tarik Jul 9 '13 at 11:38
    
Exactly and you have to catch Exception in this case because from the outside it is all you see. –  Casey Jul 9 '13 at 11:51

Looks OK to me except that I would suggest to have the user names and corresponding IDs in a database table instead of having them hardcoded.

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This could have been a comment. –  zEro Jul 9 '13 at 12:13

First of all, as other mentioned the double loop doesn't appear to be a problem in itself. There are alternative approaches where you might trade off use of memory for speed. One could be to use a tabular representation, just as if you were dealing with a database, and write just one for loop cycling through the table "rows". Here's how you might rewrite your main() method:

public static void main(String args[]) {
    List<String[]> users = new ArrayList<String[]>();
    users.add(new String[]{"user101", "UBSC1"});
    users.add(new String[]{"user101", "HDBG1"});
    users.add(new String[]{"user101", "GHYU1"});
    users.add(new String[]{"adminuser", "UBSC1"});
    users.add(new String[]{"adminuser", "HDBG1"});
    users.add(new String[]{"adminuser", "GHYU1"});

    for (String[] user : users) {
        try {
                List<String> Items = getItemsCorrespondingtoId(user[0], user[1]);

                filter(Items, user[0]);
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
    }
}
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