Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code:

  object obj = new object { };
  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
  watch.Start();
  for (int i = 0; i < 90000; i++)
  {
      new Thread(() =>
      {
          lock (obj)
          {
              string file = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(saeed);
              File.AppendAllText(string.Format(@"c:\Temp\{0}.txt", i), file);
          }
      }).Start();
  }
  watch.Stop();

runs in like 15 minutes, while this code:

  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
  watch.Start();
  for (int i = 0; i < 90000; i++)
  {
      {
          string file = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(saeed);
          File.AppendAllText(string.Format(@"c:\Temp\{0}.txt", i), file);
      }
  }
  watch.Stop();

runs in like 45 seconds. Why is the first application so much slower while it's threaded? Isn't it true that using threads is a technique for improving performance of an application?

Update: Even by using closure concepts and referencing a middle-variable instead of i in my thread instead of using lock, which makes threads really async, still creating those files takes more than 5 minutes.

  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
  watch.Start();
  for (int i = 0; i < 90000; i++)
  {
      var x = i;
      new Thread(() =>
      {
          string file = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(saeed);
          File.AppendAllText(string.Format(@"c:\Temp\{0}.txt", i), file);
      }).Start();
  }
  watch.Stop();
share|improve this question
28  
There is no point in multithreading if you add a huge lock block... –  ken2k Jul 9 '13 at 11:12
5  
because you create new thread on every iteration –  Nikita Brizhak Jul 9 '13 at 11:12
3  
You're spinning up new threads each time.. and each thread has the same sync. You may as well have written a normal for loop with a couple more zero's on the end. The CPU is spinning for ages waiting for your lock to be released. –  Simon Whitehead Jul 9 '13 at 11:13
16  
It is hugely dangerous to just flat out consider Threads as a "technique for improving performance of an application". –  Simon Whitehead Jul 9 '13 at 11:14
6  
Get rid of the lock, then replace your for with Enumerable.Range(0,90000).AsParallel().ForAll( i=> { Contents of task}); –  Bob Vale Jul 9 '13 at 11:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

1) you are currently creating 90000 threads, which is not efficient at all. Don't create every time a thread, use a thread pool instead, so you reuse threads that are already created. Remember creating a thread takes some time and memory.

2) you are locking the whole code block with lock, which means each thread is blocked until another thread completed its work. So you basically are defeating the whole purpose of multi-threading here.

3) Disk I/O doesn't work well with multi-threading for complex hardware-related reasons (buffers....etc.). Generally it's not a good idea to multi-thread this part of code.


About comments concerning disk I/O and multi-threading : that's quite complicated actually.

For magnetic disks, the disk arm has to move in order to read/write bytes on the good sector/cylinder/track. If you write 2 different files at the same time (case of two threads, each writing a different file), depending on the physical file location on disk, you may ask your disk arm to switch from one physical location to another very quickly, which destroys performances. Writing multiple disk sectors for the first file on one physical location, then moving the disk arm to another location, then writing some disks sectors for the second file would be much more efficient. You can see this effect when you compare the time to copy two files at the same time vs copying one file, then the other.

So for this very basic example, performance gain/loss depends on:

  • hardware itself. There is no disk arm with SSDs, so file access is way more faster
  • physical file location
  • file fragmentation
  • bufferization. The disk buffer system helps reading consecutive blocks, which could not be of any help in case you have to move the arm to another location.

My humble advice: try to avoid multiple reads/writes in multiple threads if performances is your primary goal.

share|improve this answer
1  
#3 is not an absolute. In fact, processing multiple files in parallel is a common (and efficient) trick for quick-and-dirty parallelism from the command line. E.g. using xargs in Linux to execute the same command for multiple files –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 9 '13 at 11:21
    
Depends on the data, if you need to load 500kb from 500 files and do heavy CPU bound processing then yes it would help, otherwise if its 500MB and just moving data around then it likely won't help so much –  paulm Jul 9 '13 at 11:22
    
Obviously, we are talking about the 500 files here –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 9 '13 at 11:24
    
@PanagiotisKanavos you're absolutely right, it's not always true. But it depends on so much factors (magnetic disks vs SSD, file fragmentation, size of written blocks...) that it's hard to expect a performance gain and should be avoided if possible (IMHO) except if you really know what you're doing and what will be the impact on I/O of multi-threading –  ken2k Jul 9 '13 at 11:25
1  
It's not that disk IO doesn't work well with multithreading - actually, multiple threads can be useful when doing blocking IO in one thread while doing stuff in the others, or taking turns for IO. The point is that you typically don't have any gain in performance writing to the same disc from multiple threads at top speed, because it's just one disc and it's way slower than the processor anyway, so multithreading does not affect the real bottleneck here. "buffers" have little to do with all this (actually, they help increase the performance). –  Matteo Italia Jul 9 '13 at 11:29

Threading can speedup your code by giving you more execution engines. But you are exploring very different resource limits in the first snippet.

The first one is the ability of the machine to commit 90 gigabytes of memory. The space required for the stacks of the threads. That takes a while, your harddisk if probably furiously working to create the backup store for that much memory. .NET is a bit unusual in that it commits the stack space for a thread, it provides an execution guarantee. Something you can turn off btw, the <disableCommitThreadStack> element in the app.exe.config file ought to have a very noticeable effect.

The second resource limit you are exploring is the ability of the file system to modify that many files concurrently. It will be greatly hampered by the first limitation, you are stealing lots of RAM away from the file system cache. When it runs out of space, you are seeing the effect of these threads all trying to commandeer the disk write head. Forcing it to zip back and forth between the file clusters. Disk seeks are very slow, by far the slowest operation on a disk. It is a mechanical operation, the drive head arm needs to physically move, something that takes many milliseconds. The hard page faults your code is very likely to generate makes it a lot worse as well.

The lock in your threaded code will reduce this thrashing but won't eliminate it. With the large memory demand, your program is liable to generate a great many deal of page faults. Worse case is on every thread context switch. The thread will be blocked while the disk performs a seek + read to satisfy the page-in request.

Well, kudos to Windows by letting you do this and not falling over. But clearly this was a bad idea. Use at most a few threads. Or just one if the writes are going to saturate the file system cache anyway so you'll avoid the seek penalty.

share|improve this answer
6  
I always manage to learn something from your posts Hans. Thanks. –  Simon Whitehead Jul 9 '13 at 12:13
    
In the original code presented in the question, the lock prevents the code from working concurrently. 90000 threads are created, all of them at the gate except one running the code. I would expect that most of the time is spent waiting for thread management. –  Tarik Jul 9 '13 at 18:58

I would note that most answers haven't read the example the code. This is not about spawning a bunch of threads and writing to disk, this is about spawning a bunch of threads, doing some work new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(saeed); and then writing to disk!

This is important to note, because the longer that work takes the more benefit simple threading provides by making sure the disk isn't idling while computation takes place.


The long and short of it is because you wrote some simplistic code, as others have explained:

  1. You are creating 90,000 threads - this is expensive and unnecessary!
  2. You are locking all the work, making this single threaded!
    1. Yes without the lock you get an exception... that doesn't magically make the lock a good idea from a performance idea - it just means you've got erroneous code.

A quick and easy way to get into threading - that's slightly less dangerous (though you can still stuff it up) is to use the Task Parallel Library. For example:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication15
{
    class Program
    {
        const int FILE_COUNT = 9000;
        const int DATA_LENGTH = 100;
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (Directory.Exists(@"c:\Temp\")) Directory.Delete(@"c:\Temp\", true);
            Directory.CreateDirectory(@"c:\Temp\");

            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (int i = 0; i < FILE_COUNT; i++)
            {
                string data = new string(i.ToString()[0], DATA_LENGTH);
                File.AppendAllText(string.Format(@"c:\Temp\{0}.txt", i), data);
            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Wrote 90,000 files single-threaded in {0}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

            Directory.Delete(@"c:\Temp\", true);
            Directory.CreateDirectory(@"c:\Temp\");

            watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Parallel.For(0, FILE_COUNT, i =>
            {
                string data = new string(i.ToString()[0], DATA_LENGTH);
                File.AppendAllText(string.Format(@"c:\Temp\{0}.txt", i), data);
            });
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Wrote 90,000 files multi-threaded in {0}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }
    }
}

The single threaded version runs in about 8.1 seconds, and the multi-threaded version runs in about 3.8 seconds. Note that my test values are different than yours.

While the TPL's default settings aren't always optimised for the scenario you're working on, they provide a much better basis than running 90,000 threads! You'll also note that in this case I don't have to do any locking nor do I have to handle the closure - because the API presented already handles that for me.

share|improve this answer
    
How will TPL tasks (which use the threadpool anyway) help here? –  Simon Whitehead Jul 9 '13 at 11:53
    
i updated my question –  Test Jul 9 '13 at 11:54
    
@SimonWhitehead TPL provides multithreading, which in my test did improve performance. TPL also provides a bunch of built in features, like thread-pooling, that significantly improve performance over the OP's attempts. –  NPSF3000 Jul 9 '13 at 12:07
    
Without testing it I'm having a hard time believing the performance increase all that significant. Yes the pooling will result in < 90k threads, but the locking alone with the threadpool thread cap would surely continue to bog this down. All speculation I guess though. –  Simon Whitehead Jul 9 '13 at 12:12
    
@SimonWhitehead I doubled my performance in the test code, reread my answer. –  NPSF3000 Jul 9 '13 at 12:16

The reason is two fold

  1. Creating a Thread is expensive in that it takes a non-trivial amount of time to do.
  2. You are locking on obj, this actually ensures only a single thread can run at a time in this example, so you're not actually running in a multi-threaded way.
share|improve this answer
    
If you remove the lock statement, Exceptions would be fired. Try it. –  Saeed Neamati Jul 9 '13 at 11:16
    
@SaeedNeamati: That's true, updating my answer. –  Ian Jul 9 '13 at 11:16
    
Maybe he needs different files. –  Saeed Neamati Jul 9 '13 at 11:19
1  
He probably gets exceptions because he has no control over the value of i at the moment the started threads use it to generate the filename and he may very well end up with threads accessing the same file at the same time. –  Anton Jul 9 '13 at 11:31

Because a thread is made inside the for loop with the lock. So the threads are performed one by one and not simultaneously like in the second example.

share|improve this answer
    
If you remove the lock statement, Exceptions would be fired. Try it. –  Saeed Neamati Jul 9 '13 at 11:15
    
The second example isn't threaded at all... –  Ian Jul 9 '13 at 11:15
    
Besides the lock, creating 90K threads is not exactly easy on the system. –  Matteo Italia Jul 9 '13 at 11:19
1  
The process cannot access the file 'c:\Temp\66.txt' because it is being used by another process. –  Saeed Neamati Jul 9 '13 at 11:22
3  
@Saeed Neamati, its because of the way you use closure in your example. You cant use it like that when multithreading. Value of i changes constantly and there is no guarantee, that when you access i in your thread its value will be the same as it was, when this thread was created. You should remove lock and copy i value to local varibale on every iteration, an then use this local variable in your threads, instead of using i. –  Nikita Brizhak Jul 9 '13 at 11:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.