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Our (very legacy) codebase has an ActiveX Client UI which requires building and committing the binaries to SVN.

We use a trunk, feature branch and tagged releases repository pattern.

I wrote a NAnt script to compile the release packages by determining the commit revisions of branch and tag creation and using svn diff to list the changes to the UI binaries between the two - these are then exported from the repository to generate the release package:

<exec program="svn.exe" 
      commandline="diff svn://hostname/Project/branches/1.2/Client -r 1234:5678 --summarize --xml" 
      output="c:\Temp\ClientComponents.xml" />

<xmllist file="c:\Temp\ClientComponents.xml" 
         property="ClientComponents" 
         delim="," 
         xpath="/diff/paths/path[@kind = 'file' and @item != 'deleted']" />

<foreach item="String" in="${ClientComponents}" delim="," property="source">

    <!-- svn export -->

</foreach>

The output from svn diff looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<diff>
<paths>
<path
   item="modified"
   props="none"
   kind="file">svn://hostname/project/branches/1.2/Client/Component1.cab</path>
</paths>
</diff>

This has worked fine up until now - as we now have 2 concurrent feature branches.

The first feature branch (e.g. 1.1) has made a change to the Client UI which has correctly been packaged in a 1.1.1 version.

This change has been merged forward into the second branch (e.g. 1.2) and when I now try to package 1.2.1 it includes the Client UI changes that were merged from 1.1

Is there any way to exclude merged changes on the svn diff command?

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1 Answer 1

Use the creation date of the 1.2 branch as the first argument to the diff command:

svn diff -r {2013-07-09}:HEAD foo

References

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