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I am writing a program that loads data from four XML files into four different data structures. It has methods like this:

def loadFirst(year)
  File.open("games_#{year}.xml",'r') do |f|
    doc = REXML::Document.new f
    ...
  end
end
def loadSecond(year)
  File.open("teams_#{year}.xml",'r') do |f|
    doc = REXML::Document.new f
    ...
  end
end

etc...

I originally just used one thread and loaded one file after another:

def loadData(year)
  time = Time.now
  loadFirst(year)
  loadSecond(year)
  loadThird(year)
  loadFourth(year)
  puts Time.now - time
end

Then I realized that I should be using multiple threads. My expectation was that loading from each file on a separate thread would be very close to four times as fast as doing it all sequentially (I have a MacBook Pro with an i7 processor):

def loadData(year)
  time = Time.now
  t1 = Thread.start{loadFirst(year)}
  t2 = Thread.start{loadSecond(year)}
  t3 = Thread.start{loadThird(year)}
  loadFourth(year)
  t1.join
  t2.join
  t3.join
  puts Time.now - time
end

What I found was that the version using multiple threads is actually slower than the other. How can this possibly be? The difference is around 20 seconds with each taking around 2 to 3 minutes.

There are no shared resources between the threads. Each opens a different data file and loads data into a different data structure than the others.

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2  
Which version of the language and which VM are you using? I believe most ruby runtimes are still using "green" threads (read: not actually multithreaded, but instead emulated in a single thread) –  Iron Savior Jul 9 '13 at 13:38
2  
classic ruby has a GIL - you don't get compute parallelism because in general only one thread runs at a time (with exceptions for IO and some other cases). try your code with jruby –  Frederick Cheung Jul 9 '13 at 13:47
1  
Perhaps you can program to print out the current time (up to usec if necessary) when each thread starts and ends. Then you will have better idea what is happening. Especially, you should be able to see whether the n+1 th thread starts before the n th thread ends. –  sawa Jul 9 '13 at 13:47
1  
See this link for details about the thread implementations in various ruby runtimes. You're not actually getting concurrent execution with Ruby 1.9.3. It's a fantastic language, but the implementations are still somewhat young in some respects. –  Iron Savior Jul 9 '13 at 13:48
1  
my guess is having multiple threads causes some kind of swapping contention to be added. You could profile it I suppose... –  rogerdpack Jul 9 '13 at 15:48
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think (but I'm not sure) the problem is that you are reading (using multiple threads) contents placed on the same disk, so all your threads can't run simultaneously because they wait for IO (disk).

Some days ago I had to do a similar thing (but fetching data from network) and the difference between sequential vs threads was huge.

A possible solution could be to load all file content instead of load it like you did in your code. In your code you read contents line by line. If you load all the content and then process it you should be able to perform much better (because threads should not wait for IO)

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Thank you, this is a great idea. –  andrew.cuthbert Jul 17 '13 at 2:16
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It's impossible to give a conclusive answer to why your parallel problem is slower than the sequential one without a lot more information, but one possibility is:

With the sequential program, your disk seeks to the first file, reads it all out, seeks to the 2nd file, reads it all out, and so on.

With the parallel program, the disk head keeps moving back and forth trying to service I/O requests from all 4 threads.

I don't know if there's any way to measure disk seek time on your system: if so, you could confirm whether this hypothesis is true.

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1  
Slightly off-topic: I have used thread parallelism on Ruby for processing multiple network requests concurrently, and it did wonders for my program's efficiency. That was on MRI (CRuby). So it's not as if you necessarily have to move to JRuby to get any benefit from using threads for parallel I/O. –  Alex D Jul 9 '13 at 14:28
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