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Before asking, let me say that I have searched, but I am kinda new on C++ so I need some help with that.

I want a way to serialize and deserialize Objects to JSON, as automatic as possible.

Serialize: For me, the ideal way is that if I call in an instance JSONSerialize() it returns an string with a JSON object that has all the public properties of the object as "name_of_property": "value". For those values that are primitives, it is straightforward, for objects it should try to call on each JSONSerialize() or ToString() or something like that to recursively serialize all the public properties. For collections it should also behave correctly (just vectors/arrays will be ok).

Deserialize: Just make an instance of the given object (let's say a dog) and call JSONDeserialize(json_string), and that should fill all the public properties, creating the needed objects in case that the properties are not primitives, or the needed collections.

An example should run like that:

Dog *d1 = new Dog();
d1->name = "myDog";

string serialized = d1->JSONSerialize();

Dog *d2 = new Dog();
d2->JSONDeserialize(serialized);
std::cout << d2->name; // This will print "myDog"

Or like that:

Dog *d1 = new Dog();
d1->name = "myDog";

string serialized = JSONSerializer.Serialize(d1);

Dog *d2 = JSONSerializer.Deserialize(serialized, Dog);
std::cout << d2->name; // This will print "myDog"

Does anything, easy like that, exists?? THANKS :))

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/8220130/converting-c-class-to-json – rhughes Jul 9 '13 at 13:50
    
@rhughes: I've took a look at that post... but I don't find there what I am looking for... does it means that there's no way to do what I am asking for? – Vicenç Gascó Jul 9 '13 at 14:13
2  
Not directly at least. What you are asking for requires reflection, the ability to enumerate and evaluate properties of a type at runtime. C++ can not do that directly. You might be able to find a library, but afaik there is no way to do this without you at some point explicitly specifying the available fields plus their names and types. – Wutz Jul 9 '13 at 14:19
    
Do you know if there is something like that in Java? The project is being evaluated and I just want to know all the options! – Vicenç Gascó Jul 9 '13 at 15:04
    
@VicençGascó: "Something like that" should be available in python(although I strongly dislike it, working with json in python is easy), lisp and similar languages. If language supports structures and has "interpreter" where you can type and execute commands immediately, then this feature may be available. – SigTerm Jul 9 '13 at 16:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

For that you need reflection in C/C++ language, that doesn't exists. You need to have some meta data describing the structure of your classes (members, inherited base classes). For the moment C/C++ compilers doesn't provide automatically that information in built binaries.

I had the same idea in mind, and I used GCC XML project to get this information. It outputs XML data describing class structures. I have built a project and I'm explaining some key points in this page :

Serialization is easy, but we have to deal with complex data structure implementations (std::string, std::map for example) that play with allocated buffers. Deserialization is more complex and you need to rebuild your object with all its members, plus references to vtables ... a painful implementation.

For example you can serialize like that :

    // Random class initialization
    com::class1* aObject = new com::class1();

    for (int i=0; i<10; i++){
            aObject->setData(i,i);
    }      

    aObject->pdata = new char[7];
    for (int i=0; i<7; i++){
            aObject->pdata[i] = 7-i;
    }
    // dictionary initialization
    cjson::dictionary aDict("./data/dictionary.xml");

    // json transformation
    std::string aJson = aDict.toJson<com::class1>(aObject);

    // print encoded class
    cout << aJson << std::endl ;

To deserialize data it works like that:

    // decode the object
    com::class1* aDecodedObject = aDict.fromJson<com::class1>(aJson);

    // modify data
    aDecodedObject->setData(4,22);

    // json transformation
    aJson = aDict.toJson<com::class1>(aDecodedObject);

    // print encoded class
    cout << aJson << std::endl ;

Ouptuts:

>:~/cjson$ ./main
{"_index":54,"_inner":  {"_ident":"test","pi":3.141593},"_name":"first","com::class0::_type":"type","com::class0::data":[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],"com::classb::_ref":"ref","com::classm1::_type":"typem1","com::classm1::pdata":[7,6,5,4,3,2,1]}
{"_index":54,"_inner":{"_ident":"test","pi":3.141593},"_name":"first","com::class0::_type":"type","com::class0::data":[0,1,2,3,22,5,6,7,8,9],"com::classb::_ref":"ref","com::classm1::_type":"typem1","com::classm1::pdata":[7,6,5,4,3,2,1]}
>:~/cjson$ 

Usually these implementations are compiler dependent (ABI Specification for example), and requires external description to work (GCCXML output), such are not really easy to integrate to projects.

share|improve this answer
    
What if you wanted to do this with debug symbols on? – Ahmed Fasih Jan 9 '15 at 20:23

Does anything, easy like that, exists?? THANKS :))

C++ does not store class member names in compiled code, and there's no way to discover (at runtime) which members (variables/methods) class contains. In other words, you cannot iterate through members of a struct. Because there's no such mechanism, you won't be able to automatically create "JSONserialize" for every object.

You can, however, use any json library to serialize objects, BUT you'll have to write serialization/deserialization code yourself for every class. Either that, or you'll have to create serializeable class similar to QVariantMap that'll be used instead of structs for all serializeable objects.

In other words, if you're okay with using specific type for all serializeable objects (or writing serialization routines yourself for every class), it can be done. However, if you want to automatically serialize every possible class, you should forget about it. If this feature is important to you, try another language.

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Would the same hold true for managed C++? – Tevo D Jul 9 '13 at 14:33
    
@TevoD: I don't use managed c++ so I don't know. Test it yourself. – SigTerm Jul 9 '13 at 16:32
    
Was more of a curiosity than anything else. I don't use it either. – Tevo D Jul 9 '13 at 16:39

In case that anyone still has this need (I have), I have written a library myself to deal with this problem. See here. It requires you to write the definition in another file instead declaring a regular C++ class/struct, but that is as far as you can get automatically in C++ due to the lack of reflection.

share|improve this answer

There is no reflection in C++. True. But if the compiler can't provide you the metadata you need, you can provide it yourself.

Let's start by making a propery struct:

template<typename Class, typename T>
struct Property {
    constexpr Property(T Class::*aMember, const char* aName) : member{aMember}, name{aName} {}

    using Type = T;

    T Class::*member;
    const char* name;
};

template<typename Class, typename T>
constexpr auto makeProperty(T Class::*member, const char* name) {
    return Property<Class, T>{member, name};
}

Ok, now we have the building block of our compile-time introspection system.

Now in your class user, add your metadata:

struct Dog {
    constexpr static auto properties = std::make_tuple(
        makeProperty(&Dog::barkType, "barkType"),
        makeProperty(&Dog::color, "color")
    );

private:
    std::string barkType;
    std::string color;
};

Now that you have the desired metadata, you can iterate through it by recursion to unserialize:

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
void doSetData(T&& object, const Json::Value& data) {
    // get the property
    constexpr auto property = std::get<iteration>(std::decay_t<T>::properties);

    // get the type of the property
    using Type = typename decltype(property)::Type;

    // set the value to the member
    object.*(property.member) = asAny<Type>(data[U(property.name)]);
}

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
std::enable_if_t<(iteration > 0)>
setData(T&& object, const Json::Value& data) {
    doSetData<iteration>(object, data);
    // next iteration
    setData<iteration - 1>(object, data);
}

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
std::enable_if_t<(iteration == 0)>
setData(T&& object, const Json::Value& data) {
    doSetData<iteration>(object, data);
}

template<typename T>
T fromJson(Json::Value data) {
    T object;

    setData<std::tuple_size<decltype(T::properties)>::value - 1>(object, data);

    return object;
}

And for serialize:

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
void doSetDataJson(T&& object, Json::Value& data) {
    // get the property
    constexpr auto property = std::get<iteration>(std::decay_t<T>::properties);

    // get the type of the property
    using Type = typename decltype(property)::Type;

    // set the value to the member
    data[property.name] = object.*(property.member);
}

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
std::enable_if_t<(iteration > 0)>
setDataJson(T&& object, Json::Value& data) {
    doSetDataJson<iteration>(object, data);
    // next iteration
    setDataJson<iteration - 1>(object, data);
}

template<std::size_t iteration, typename T>
std::enable_if_t<(iteration == 0)>
setDataJson(T&& object, Json::Value& data) {
    doSetDataJson<iteration>(object, data);
}

template<typename T>
Json::Value toJson(T&& object) {
    Json::Value data;

    setDataJson<std::tuple_size<decltype(T::properties)>::value - 1>(object, data);

    return data;
}

Now you can use your functions like this:

Dog dog;

dog.setColor("green");
dog.setBarkType("whaf");

Json::Value jsonDog = toJson(dog); // produces {"color":"green", "barkType":"whaf"}
Dog dog2 = fromJson(jsonDog);

assert(dog == dog2); // pass the test, both dog are equal!

Done! No need for run-time reflection, just some C++14 goodness!

This code could benefit from some improvement

Note that one would need to write the asAny function. It's just a function that takes a Json::Value and call the right as... function, or another fromJson.

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If you are at linux platform , You can directly use json.h library for serialization. Here is sample code i have come across :)

**

Json Serializer

**

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