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I have the following code in which I use fork to launch my script. The script is listening on the stdin. I try to send data via pipe to myscript but the scipt did not get the data from C. Am I missing something in my code?

static int pfds_in[2], pfds_out[2];

void external_init()
{
    int pid;

    if (pipe(pfds_in) < 0)
        return;

    if (pipe(pfds_out) < 0)
        return;

    if ((pid = fork()) == -1)
        goto error;

    if (pid == 0) {
        /* child */
        close(pfds_in[0]);
        dup2(pfds_in[1], 1);
        close(pfds_in[1]);

        close(pfds_out[0]);
        dup2(pfds_out[1], 0);
        close(pfds_out[1]);

        const char *argv[5];
        int i = 0;
        argv[i++] = "/bin/sh";
        argv[i++] = fc_script;
        argv[i++] = "--json";
        argv[i++] = "json_continuous_input";
        argv[i++] = NULL;
        execvp(argv[0], (char **) argv);
        exit(ESRCH);
    }
    close(pfds_in[1]);
    close(pfds_out[1]);
    return;

error:
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}


static void external_write_pipe_output(const char *msg)
{
    char *value = NULL;
    int i=0, len;
    asprintf(&value, "%s\n", msg);
    if (write(pfds_out[0], value, strlen(value)) == -1) {
        perror("Error occured when trying to write to the pipe");
    }
    free(value);
}

int main()
{
    external_init();
    external_write_pipe_output("any");
}
share|improve this question

You mismatched the both file descriptors you get from pipe(). pfds_in[0] is for reading, so you have to use dup2( pfds_in[0], 0 ) in your child and in the parent you write into the pipe using pfds_in[1].

Btw: What did you want to achieve by dup( ..., 1 ) in your child?. If you want to redirect child's stdout into a pipe to your parent you have to create another pipe

share|improve this answer
    
dup( ..., 0 ) for stdout and dup( ..., 1 ) for stdin see this topic – MOHAMED Jul 9 '13 at 14:34
    
OK, I didn't look correctly. But you will always need pfds_...[0] to dup 0 and pfds_...[1] to dup 1` – Ingo Leonhardt Jul 9 '13 at 14:37
    
He is using two pipes actually, but yeah, MOHAMED switch dup2(pfds_out[1], 0); to dup2(pfds_out[0], 0); and write(pfds_out[0]... to write(pfds_out[1] – LostBoy Jul 9 '13 at 14:39

You've got your pipe ends in a muddle.

In the child you should have:

close(pfds_in[0]);
dup2(pfds_in[1], 1);
close(pfds_in[1]);

close(pfds_out[1]);
dup2(pfds_out[0], 0);
close(pfds_out[0]);

And in the parent:

close(pfds_in[1]);
close(pfds_out[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
and to write to the pipe? I have to use: write(pfds_out[0],...) or write(pfds_out[1],...) ? – MOHAMED Jul 9 '13 at 14:50
    
write(pfds_out[1],...) – LostBoy Jul 9 '13 at 15:00
    
[0] is the read-end, [1] is the write-end of the pipe. – ams Jul 9 '13 at 15:13
    
It does not work – MOHAMED Jul 9 '13 at 16:02

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