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I am not able to spy of multiple ajax request from a single test spec.I want to test the below myFirstFunction() and mySecondFunction() using JASMINE.

function myFirstFunction() {
    $.postJSON('test1.htm', {operation:operation}, function (data) {    
        if (data != null && data.errorMsg != null && data.errorMsg.length > 0) {
            $.populateErrorMessage(data);
        } else { 
            operationAccess = data;
            var tempAccessFlag = operationAccess[0].accessFlag;
            if (tempAccessFlag) {
                mySecondFunction();
            }                  
        }
    });
}

function mySecondFunction(operation, operationAccess, reason) {
        $.postJSON('test2.htm', {windowStart:0, windowSize:4}, function (data) {
            if (data != null && data.errorMsg != null && data.errorMsg.length > 0) {
                $.populateErrorMessage(data);
            } else {
                if (null != data && data.accessFlag == "SUCCESS") {
                    //do something
                } else {
                    //do something
                }
            }
        });
}

I wrote the following test spec & able to spy first postJSON as following as following -

it("Test myFirstFunction & mySecondFunction", function () {
        var operation = "customerPreviousOrder";
        var myFirstFunctionData = [{"accessFlag":true}]
        spyOn($, "ajax").andCallFake(function(params) {
            params.success(myFirstFunctionData);
        });
        myFirstFunction();
        expect(<Something>).toEqual(<Something>);

});

I want to test mySecondFunction() from the above test spec. Because myFirstFunction() call the mySecondFunction(). So how can I spy the second postJSON ?

share|improve this question

You should use sinonJS which has a fake server that mocks the ajax stuff so you dont have to care about it.

var server = sinon.fakeServer.create();
server.respondWith('test1.htm', '[{"accessFlag":true}]');
server.respondWith('test2.htm', 'second answer');
server.autoRespond = true;

myFirstFunction();
share|improve this answer

You can try the dummy solution of your issue below.

Source function:

function myFunction(){
 $.ajax({                               //First Ajax Call
    url: <URL1>,
    type: 'POST',
    dataType: 'json',
    data: JSON.stringify(data),
    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    async: false,

    success: function (data) {
            … some success statement
    } else {
           var enableCardReaderCall = $.ajax({            //Nested Ajax Call
                    type: 'POST',
                    url: <URL2>,
                    dataType: 'json',
        data: JSON.stringify(data),
                   contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",

                    success: function (result) {
    // … some success statement
                    }
              }
 });

}); }

Test Suite:

describe("Test Suit", function(){
   beforeEach(function () {
      var fakeData = "hi";
     spyOn($, "ajax").andCallFake(function(params) {            //First Spy On 
        params.success(function(fakeData){
            spyOn($, "ajax").andCallFake(function(params) {     //Nested Spy On
               params.success("there is data")
            })
        });
     });
});
it("Test Function", function() {
    $.myFunction();
});

});

share|improve this answer

Argument of ajax function has url value.

describe("Test Suit", function() {
  beforeEach(function() {
    spyOn($, 'ajax').and.callFake(function(options) {
      if (options.url === 'test1.htm') {
        options.success([{"accessFlag":true}]);
      } else {
        options.success('second answer'); 
      }
    });
  });
  it("Test myFirstFunction & mySecondFunction", function () {
    myFirstFunction();
    expect(<Something>).toEqual(<Something>);
  }
});
share|improve this answer

The guys from Pivotal develop and maintain Jasmine-Ajax, that adds AJAX support to Jasmine so you can test requests and mock responses. The mock is installed in the test or in the beforeEach by

jasmine.Ajax.useMock();

All requests in the tests are collected and available in global variable ajaxRequests. No response is returned to any of those requests. To simulate response you have to call .response([some data]) in the test.

So it will be something like:

it("Test myFirstFunction & mySecondFunction", function () {
    var myFirstFunctionData = {responseText: '[{"accessFlag":true}]'};
    jasmine.Ajax.useMock();  
    myFirstFunction();
    ajaxRequests[0].response(myFirstFunctionData);  // index depends on the order of the AJAX calls
    expect(<Something>).toEqual(<Something>);

});

Note: There is global method to get latest AJAX request mostRecentAjaxRequest();. When you need to directly access elements of the ajaxRequests please add:

afterEach(function(){
    clearAjaxRequests();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Which version of jasmine-ajax did you use? Looks like jasmine.Ajax.useMock is not defined anymore in 2.0: jasmine.github.io/2.0/ajax.html – Benny Neugebauer Aug 17 '15 at 11:15
    
I couldn't find version number but I had added the mock-ajax.js in early 2013. So I imagine it's ancient :) – Sve Aug 19 '15 at 7:57
    
From a brief look: jasmine-ajax 3.2.0 implemented a requestTracker. Requests are accessed via jasmine.Ajax.requests.at(<position>). – Sve Aug 19 '15 at 8:03

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