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I find myself wanting to get the ASP.NET machine key for the current application. This is, of course, easy if a machine key is specified in the configuration file, but if it's set to auto generate then there doesn't seem to be a public method anywhere to get it.

Basically I want at it so I can write an encrypted/MACed cookie for myself, just like the ASP.NET Forms Authentication provider does.

Does anyone have any pointers or ideas?

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4 Answers 4

If you're using .NET 4, there's the MachineKey class. It doesn't give you raw access to the actual key, but it does provide methods for Encoding and Decoding the data using the same algorithms as the FormsAuthentication class, along with options for adding validation w/ an HMAC.

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If the ASP.NET Forms Authentication provider can access it then have you tried looking at the provider source code? (I think this is the correct location, ScottGu's original blog post on the subject has had broken links since they updated MSDN)

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The Forms Auth provider can get at it because there are internal methods to allow it :) –  blowdart Nov 18 '09 at 11:39
    
And I assume it's not possible to reproduce those methods because the source for those internal methods isn't available? –  tjrobinson Nov 18 '09 at 12:06
1  
They're available, kind of, but the actual backing store for the auto generated MAC key isn't, so even if used reflector, cut and pasted the methods, the actual key itself seems inaccessible. Which makes me wonder if I missed something! –  blowdart Nov 19 '09 at 10:21

Do you actually NEED the key? Or just to encrypt and decrypt the data?

System.Web.Security.FormsAuthentication (.NET 2.0) has public Encrypt/Decrypt methods. These use System.Web.Configuration.MachineKeySection EncryptOrDecryptData, ByteArrayToHexString and HexStringToByteArray to encrypt and decrypt the data.

EncryptOrDecryptData handles loading / configuring the key data from config files/AutoGenerate as required.

Encrypt And Decrypt should be available via the source code downloads or reflector and readily converted to your purpose.

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Wow, that was a while back. And yes, I did need the machine key specifically. –  blowdart Oct 23 '10 at 16:48
    
@blowdart: Did you ever find a way to access the key? I'm looking for the same thing. –  StevieG Aug 26 '11 at 23:10

Mr. Curious was curious about getting the machine key as well. The properties on the MachineKeySection are no good, as they get zeroed-out after initialization, which happens before you can read them with reflection.

After a bit of digging in the current 4.5 framework, turns out that the auto generated keys are stored in HttpApplication.s_autogenKeys byte array. The validation key is the first 64 bytes, followed by 24 bytes of the decryption key.

If you are not opting in into the new crypto stuff in 4.5 framework, that is, you didn't set <httpRuntime targetFramework="4.5"> in your web.config (which is the case if you have an app you created with a previous version of the framework), then you get to the keys like this:

        byte[] autogenKeys = (byte[])typeof(HttpRuntime).GetField("s_autogenKeys", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static).GetValue(null);

        int validationKeySize = 64;
        int decryptionKeySize = 24;

        byte[] validationKey = new byte[validationKeySize];
        byte[] decryptionKey = new byte[decryptionKeySize];

        Buffer.BlockCopy(autogenKeys, 0, validationKey, 0, validationKeySize);
        Buffer.BlockCopy(autogenKeys, validationKeySize, decryptionKey, 0, decryptionKeySize);

        // This is the IsolateApps bit, which is set for both keys
        int pathHash = StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase.GetHashCode(HttpRuntime.AppDomainAppVirtualPath);
        validationKey[0] = (byte)(pathHash & 0xff);
        validationKey[1] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff00) >> 8);
        validationKey[2] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff0000) >> 16);
        validationKey[3] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff000000) >> 24);

        decryptionKey[0] = (byte)(pathHash & 0xff);
        decryptionKey[1] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff00) >> 8);
        decryptionKey[2] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff0000) >> 16);
        decryptionKey[3] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff000000) >> 24);

The default for both keys is AutoGenerate,IsolateApps; the IsolateApps bit requires that you copy the first four bytes of the application path hash to the beginning of the key.

If you opted in into the cryptographic improvements in fx4.5, then you'll have to dig around the MachineKeyMasterKeyProvider to get the valid keys.

Getting the Keys without the HttpApplication

The HttpApplication gets its keys by calling into a native method in webengine4.dll from SetAutogenKeys(). We can call into the DLL ourselves as well. All we need to know is our application path.

Let's say that we want to get the auto generated keys for the root application, "/".

Using LinqPad:

[DllImport(@"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\webengine4.dll")]
internal static extern int EcbCallISAPI(IntPtr pECB, int iFunction, byte[] bufferIn, int sizeIn, byte[] bufferOut, int sizeOut);

void Main()
{
    string appPath = "/";
    byte[] genKeys = new byte[1024];
    byte[] autogenKeys = new byte[1024];

    int res = EcbCallISAPI(IntPtr.Zero, 4, genKeys, genKeys.Length, autogenKeys, autogenKeys.Length);

    if (res == 1) {
        // Same as above
        int validationKeySize = 64;
        int decryptionKeySize = 24;

        byte[] validationKey = new byte[validationKeySize];
        byte[] decryptionKey = new byte[decryptionKeySize];

        Buffer.BlockCopy(autogenKeys, 0, validationKey, 0, validationKeySize);
        Buffer.BlockCopy(autogenKeys, validationKeySize, decryptionKey, 0, decryptionKeySize);

        int pathHash = StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase.GetHashCode(appPath);
        validationKey[0] = (byte)(pathHash & 0xff);
        validationKey[1] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff00) >> 8);
        validationKey[2] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff0000) >> 16);
        validationKey[3] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff000000) >> 24);

        decryptionKey[0] = (byte)(pathHash & 0xff);
        decryptionKey[1] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff00) >> 8);
        decryptionKey[2] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff0000) >> 16);
        decryptionKey[3] = (byte)((pathHash & 0xff000000) >> 24);

        Console.WriteLine("DecryptionKey: {0}", decryptionKey.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (acc, c) => acc.AppendFormat("{0:x2}", c), acc => acc.ToString()));
        Console.WriteLine("ValidationKey: {0}", validationKey.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (acc, c) => acc.AppendFormat("{0:x2}", c), acc => acc.ToString()));
    }
}

Again, if you need keys for the new fx4.5 stuff, you'll need to process the keys differently once you get the autogenKeys array.

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