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Newer versions of SQLite support foreign key constraints. It is possible to define

CREATE TABLE MASTER (_ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, ...);
CREATE TABLE SERVANT (_ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, MASTERID INTEGER, 
  FOREIGN KEY(MASTERID) REFERENCES MASTER(_ID);

According to the documentation by default "NO ACTION" is used for ON DELETE and ON UPDATE. But contrary to other DBS "NO ACTION" seems not to mean, that delete or update is not performed. It seems to mean that nothing is done to preserve integrity, at least according to my tests(*) and if I understand the documentation right:

Configuring "NO ACTION" means just that: when a parent key is modified or deleted from the database, no special action is taken.

Thus

INSERT INTO MASTER (_ID) VALUES (1);
INSERT INTO SERVANT (_ID, MASTERID) VALUES (1,1);
DELETE FROM MASTER;

gives me an empty MASTER table and a SERVANT table with a foreign key pointing into nowhere.

Can anyone confirm this behaviour and maybe explain why it is implemented that way? Or do I have to configure something to make foreign key support work? I am new to SQLite development, so please foregive me, if this is a stupid question.

Edit: (*) my tests were flawed, see my answer below.

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I can't answer your specific question, but I've found the SQLite docs to be better than average in terms of accuracy and precision (though often finding the bit of information you're looking for is a challenge). –  Hot Licks Jul 9 '13 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

You are correct. "NO ACTION" means that nothing is done to preserve the integrity of the foreign key constraints. See the documentation for details on options you can set.

There are 4 other options you can set in this scenario. RESTRICT, SET NULL, SET DEFAULT and CASCADE. A brief description of what they do:

RESTRICT - A row in the MASTER table can only be deleted if it is not referenced by any rows in the SERVANT table.

SET NULL - Deleting a row in the MASTER table will cause any FKs in the SERVANT table to be set to NULL.

SET DEFAULT - Similar to set NULL except that the FK is set to the default value instead of NULL.

CASCADE - Deleting a row in the MASTER table will cause any rows in the SERVANT table that reference the deleted MASTER row to also be deleted.

To change these options, you will have to modify your create statements to specify the on update and on delete actions.

CREATE TABLE MASTER (
  _ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, 
  ...
);
CREATE TABLE SERVANT (
  _ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, 
  MASTERID INTEGER, 
  FOREIGN KEY(MASTERID) REFERENCES MASTER(_ID) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE SET NULL
);

edit: Don't forget to ensure that your version of SQLite was compiled with foreign key support and that you've enabled it by specifying PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON;

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Thank you for your answer, but I think it is not the right answer. I double checked my settings and found an error which made my foreign keys not work: PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON; must be specified for every new DB conncetion, not just once. Having corrected this, "NO ACTION" behaved as expected - perhaps I misunderstood the documentation? –  yonojoy Jul 11 '13 at 19:10
    
You are correct. PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON; has to be specified for each connection. –  CadentOrange Jul 11 '13 at 19:12
    
I have posted an other question to clarify the exact meaning of "NO ACTION": stackoverflow.com/questions/17601702/… –  yonojoy Jul 11 '13 at 19:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I will try to give an answer myself:

No, if configured right, SQLite preserves data integrity in this situation. "NO ACTION" is used by default and this prohibits deletion or update of a master key if there is still a refering key from an referencing table (tested with 3.7.x). My fault was that I was not aware that PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON; must be configured for every new connection to the database.

Edit: I think the SQLite documentation is misleading here.

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