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I had to create a sql query that gets all the users with a first name, middle name or last name that contains the character '|'. So I did something like:

SELECT two.id, 
       two.username, 
       one.firstname, 
       one.middlename, 
       one.lastname 
FROM table_one one INNER JOIN table_two two ON two.id = one.id
WHERE one.firstname LIKE '%|%' 
OR one.middlename LIKE '%|%' 
OR one.lastname LIKE '%|%'

This query works great in test environment with about one thousand profiles, but it times out in production environment, which contains hundred of thousands of profiles, if not close to one million.

We are running DB2, version 8.2

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3  
Using '%|%' makes indexes useless. –  juergen d Jul 9 '13 at 14:57
    
try to use index.... –  sourabh kasliwal Jul 9 '13 at 14:57
    
Why do you want to look for |? –  juergen d Jul 9 '13 at 14:59
    
@juergen d because it causes some problem in the system. We need to find the profiles with this character and modify them. –  Triwis Jul 9 '13 at 15:01
1  
This sounds like a one-off task. Simply use two queries, one for each of the tables. –  Daniel S. Jul 9 '13 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might try splitting the search up to remove the OR, which is notorious for poor performance:

SELECT
  two.id, 
  two.username, 
  one.firstname, 
  one.middlename, 
  one.lastname 
FROM (
  SELECT id, firstname, middlename, lastname
  FROM table_one 
  WHERE one.firstname LIKE '%|%'
  UNION
  SELECT id, firstname, middlename, lastname
  FROM table_one 
  WHERE one.middlename LIKE '%|%'
  UNION
  SELECT id, firstname, middlename, lastname
  FROM table_one 
  WHERE one.lastname LIKE '%|%'
) one
INNER JOIN table_two two ON two.id = one.id

With an index on each of the name columns, there's a chance each will be used in the separate unioned queries.

The use on UNION conveniently discards duplicates, so the case where multiple name columns contain a pipe char won't cause duplicate output.

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what about using POSITION() instead of LIKE? I don't feel like index being used in either case, but POSITION() seems to be little bit faster, then pattern match. –  David Jashi Jul 9 '13 at 15:06
    
@DavidJashi It could be, but I agree it's a slim chance either way. I can see that the optimizer may chose to scan the index rather than the table pages, because there are more entries per page in an index than a table, so there should be a benefit to scanning, and therefore "using" the index, but even if so, it probably wouldn't be much faster. I don't think there's a significant way around the poor performance. –  Bohemian Jul 9 '13 at 15:10

Try

SELECT two.id, 
       two.username, 
       one.firstname, 
       one.middlename, 
       one.lastname 
FROM table_one one INNER JOIN table_two two ON two.id = one.id
WHERE POSITION('|',concat(one.firstname,one.middlename,one.lastname),OCTETS)>0

or

SELECT two.id, 
       two.username, 
       one.firstname, 
       one.middlename, 
       one.lastname 
FROM table_one one INNER JOIN table_two two ON two.id = one.id
WHERE POSITION('|',one.firstname,OCTETS)+POSITION('|',one.middlename,OCTETS)+POSITION('|',one.lastname),OCTETS)>0
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