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I have a method that is suppose to return an object if it is found.

If it is not found, should I:

  1. return null
  2. throw an exception
  3. other
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37  
Whatever you do, make sure you document it. I think this point is more important than exactly which approach is "best". – Rik Oct 6 '08 at 23:04
6  
This depends on the prevailing idioms of the programming language. Please tag this question with a programming language tag. – Teddy Oct 1 '09 at 22:41
2  
Returning null may only mean success or failure which very often isn't much of information (some methods may fail in many ways). Libraries should better throw exceptions to make errors explicit and this way the main program can decide how to handle the error on a higher level (in contrast to builtin error handling logic). – 3k- Aug 20 '13 at 11:33
5  
Returning NULL is a bad practice, for a number of reasons, see yegor256.com/2014/05/13/why-null-is-bad.html – yegor256 Nov 13 '14 at 8:04

36 Answers 36

That depends on your method. If you method is supposed to always return a valid object and none is found, throwing an exception is the way to go. If the method is just ment to return an object which might or might not be there (like perhaps a image on a contact person) you shouldn't raise an error.

You might also want to expose a method returning a boolean true/false if this method actually will return an object so you don't have to either a) check for null or b) catch an exception

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The "other" option could be to let the find method take an additional parameter with a default object that would be returned if the sought for object cannot be found.

Otherwise I'd just return null unless it really is an exceptional case when the object isn't found.

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In data layer code, I some times use the following code, allowing the caller to decide if "object not found" means an error has occured.


DataType GetObject(DBConnection conn, string id, bool throwOnNotFound) {
    DataType retval = ... // find object in database
    if (retval != null || ! throwOnNotFound) {
        return retval;
    } else {
        throw new NoRowsFoundException("DataType object with id {id} not found in database");
    }
}

DataType GetObject(DBConnection conn, string id) {
    return GetObject(conn, id, true);
} 
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It not containing the object can happen during normal operations and should be dealt with by the caller return NULL.

If not containing the object indicates a bug by the calling code or internal state then do an assert.

If not containing the object indicates an infrequent event. (Like someone deleted an item from the store while you were checking out the item at the same time.) Then throw an exception.

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Unfortunately JDK is inconsistent, if you trying access non existing key in resource bundle, you get not found exception and when you request value from map you get null if it doesn't exists. So I would change winner answer to the following, if found value can be null, then raise exception when it isn't found, otherwise return null. So follow to the rule with one exception, if you need to know why value isn't found then always raise exception, or..

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If you are using a library or another class which throws an exception, you should rethrow it. Here is an example. Example2.java is like library and Example.java uses it's object. Main.java is an example to handle this Exception. You should show a meaningful message and (if needed) stack trace to the user in the calling side.

Main.java

public class Main {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Example example = new Example();

    try {
        Example2 obj = example.doExample();

        if(obj == null){
            System.out.println("Hey object is null!");
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Congratulations, you caught the exception!");
        System.out.println("Here is stack trace:");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
}

Example.java

/**
 * Example.java
 * @author Seval
 * @date 10/22/2014
 */
public class Example {
    /**
     * Returns Example2 object
     * If there is no Example2 object, throws exception
     * 
     * @return obj Example2
     * @throws Exception
     */
    public Example2 doExample() throws Exception {
        try {
            // Get the object
            Example2 obj = new Example2();

            return obj;

        } catch (Exception e) {
            // Log the exception and rethrow
            // Log.logException(e);
            throw e;
        }

    }
}

Example2.java

 /**
 * Example2.java
 * @author Seval
 *
 */
public class Example2 {
    /**
     * Constructor of Example2
     * @throws Exception
     */
    public Example2() throws Exception{
        throw new Exception("Please set the \"obj\"");
    }

}
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