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I have a triangle mesh that has distinct groups of triangles e.g. a group of 15 connected triangles followed by another group (not connected to the first) of 25 triangles. The number of groups of connected triangles is arbitrary and the groups themselves can be any size (1 to anything). I need to allocate each triangle vertex an index indicating which group of connected triangles it belongs to. So, in the example above, I would give the vertices that make up the group of 15 triangles an index of 0 and the vertices that make up the group of 25 triangles an index of 1 (and so on).

The code below is very slow when I feed it an array of 70,000+ triangles, but works. Does anyone have some insight into the areas of the code where I can find the most efficient optimisations?

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    //test array of vertex indices - each triple is a discrete triangle
    int vv[21] = {0,1,2, 2,3,4, 4,5,6, 7,8,9, 9,10,11, 0,99,80, 400, 401, 402};

    //setup the initial arrays prior to the while loop
    std::vector<int> active_points;
    std::vector<vector<int>> groups;
    std::vector<int> active_triplets(&vv[0], &vv[0]+21);

    //put the first three triangle points into active points
    active_points.push_back(active_triplets[0]);
    active_points.push_back(active_triplets[1]);
    active_points.push_back(active_triplets[2]);

    int group_index = 0;

    //put these initial points in the first group
    std::vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(active_points[0]);
    v.push_back(active_points[1]);
    v.push_back(active_points[2]);
    groups.push_back(v);

    //remove the first triangle points from the triplets array
    std::vector<int>::iterator it = active_triplets.begin();
    active_triplets.erase(it, it+3);

    while (active_triplets.size() > 0)
    {
        //once we've exhausted the first group of connections
        //we move on the next connected set of triangles
        if (active_points.size() == 0)
        {
            group_index++;
            active_points.push_back(active_triplets[0]);
            active_points.push_back(active_triplets[1]);
            active_points.push_back(active_triplets[2]);

            std::vector<int> v;
            for (std::vector<int>::iterator it = active_points.begin(); it != active_points.end(); ++it)
            {
                v.push_back(*it);
            }
            groups.push_back(v);

            std::vector<int>::iterator it = active_triplets.begin();
            active_triplets.erase(it,it+3);
        }

        //create a vector to store the 'connected' points of the current active points
        //I don't think I can modify any of the existing vectors as I iterate over them
        std::vector<int> temp_active_points;
        //start check this group of three vertices
        for  (std::vector<int>::iterator it = active_points.begin(); it != active_points.end(); ++it)
        {
            std::vector<int> polys_to_delete;
            for  (std::vector<int>::iterator it_a = active_triplets.begin(); it_a != active_triplets.end();++it_a)
            {
                if (*it == *it_a)
                {
                    //which triangle do we hit? put all points in temp_active_points.
                    //Once a vertex matches with another vertex we work out the other
                    //connected points in that triangle from that single connection

                    int offset = it_a - active_triplets.begin();
                    int mod = (it_a - active_triplets.begin())  % 3;
                    polys_to_delete.push_back(offset - mod);
                    if (mod == 1)
                    {
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset - 1)));
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset + 1)));
                    }
                    else if (mod ==  2)
                    {
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset - 2)));
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset - 1)));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset + 1)));
                        temp_active_points.push_back(active_triplets.at((offset + 2)));
                    }
                }
            }
            int offset_subtraction = 0;
            for  (std::vector<int>::iterator it = polys_to_delete.begin(); it != polys_to_delete.end(); ++it)
            {
                std::vector<int>::iterator it_a = active_triplets.begin();
                active_triplets.erase(it_a + (*it - offset_subtraction),  it_a + (*it - offset_subtraction) + 3);
                offset_subtraction += 3;
            }
        }
        for (std::vector<int>::iterator it = temp_active_points.begin(); it != temp_active_points.end(); ++it)
        {
            groups[group_index].push_back(*it);
        }
        //remove duplicates
        std::sort( temp_active_points.begin(), temp_active_points.end() );
        temp_active_points.erase( std::unique( temp_active_points.begin(), temp_active_points.end() ), temp_active_points.end() );
        active_points = temp_active_points; 
        temp_active_points.clear();
    }
    for (std::vector<vector<int>>::iterator it = groups.begin(); it != groups.end(); ++it)
    {
        for (std::vector<int>::iterator it_sub = (*it).begin(); it_sub != (*it).end(); ++it_sub)
        {
            std::cout <<  it - groups.begin() << ' ' << *it_sub << '\n';
        }
    }
}

After Peter's comments I've redone the code with help from a colleague. So much faster using the map:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>     // std::cout
#include <algorithm>    // std::set_difference, std::sort
#include <vector>       // std::vector
#include <set>       // std::vector
#include <cmath>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

// the global vertex indices
int numIndices;
int* indices;

class Triangle
{
public:
    explicit Triangle(int positionIndex_) : added(false), positionIndex(positionIndex_) {}

    int positionIndex; // positinon of the first index of this triangle in the global vert array (which is in  3's)

    // only valid with 0, 1, 2
    int getIndex(int i) { return indices[positionIndex + i];}

    bool isNeighbour(Triangle* other)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
                if (getIndex(i) == other->getIndex(j))
                    return true;
        return false;
    }

    bool isAdded() const{return added;}
    void setAdded(){ added = true;}

    int getNeighbourCount() const{ return neighbours.size(); }
    Triangle* getNeighbour(int i) const{ return neighbours[i];}
    void AddNeighbour(Triangle* neighbour)
    {
        neighbours.push_back(neighbour);//changed to set
    }

private:
    std::vector<Triangle*> neighbours;//changed to set
    bool added;
};

std::vector<Triangle*> triangles;

void createAllTriangles()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < numIndices; i += 3)
        triangles.push_back(new Triangle(i));

    //must delete all these pointers created with new
}

void setupAllNeighboursA()
{
    std::map<int,std::set<int>> vertex_to_tris;
    for (int i = 0; i < numIndices; i += 3)
    {
        vertex_to_tris[indices[i]].insert(i);
        vertex_to_tris[indices[i+1]].insert(i);
        vertex_to_tris[indices[i+2]].insert(i);
    }

    int n = triangles.size();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        Triangle* t = triangles[i];
        std::set<int> temp_neighbours;
        for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
        {
            int test_index = t->getIndex(j);
            for (std::set<int>::iterator it = vertex_to_tris[test_index].begin(); it != vertex_to_tris[test_index].end(); ++it)
            {
                if (*it != i) temp_neighbours.insert(*it/3);//divide by 3 to get the 'actual' tri index
            }
        }

        for (std::set<int>::iterator it = temp_neighbours.begin(); it != temp_neighbours.end(); ++it)
        {
            Triangle* other = triangles[*it];
            t->AddNeighbour(other);
        }
    }
}

class Island
{
public:
    void recursiveAdd(Triangle* t)
    {
        AddAndSetAdded(t);
        for(int i = 0; i < t->getNeighbourCount(); i++)
            if ( ! t->getNeighbour(i)->isAdded() )
                recursiveAdd(t->getNeighbour(i));
    }
    std::set<Triangle*> children;
private:
    void AddAndSetAdded(Triangle* t)
    {
        t->setAdded();
        children.insert(t);
    }
};

std::vector<Island*> island_list;

void createIslands()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < int(triangles.size()); ++i)
    {
        Triangle* t = triangles[i];
        if( ! t->isAdded() )
        {
            Island* island = new Island;
            island->recursiveAdd(t);
            island_list.push_back(island);
        }
    }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    indices = vv;
    numIndices = 73728;
    createAllTriangles();
    setupAllNeighboursA();
    createIslands();

    for (int x = 0; x < int(island_list.size()); x++)
    {
        std::cout << "Island Index: " << x << endl;
        std::cout << island_list[x]->children.size() << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about Code Review. –  Dukeling Jul 9 '13 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

I think most of the time will be spent in these lines:

for  (std::vector<int>::iterator it = active_points.begin(); it != active_points.end(); ++it)
    {
        std::vector<int> polys_to_delete;
        for  (std::vector<int>::iterator it_a = active_triplets.begin(); it_a != active_triplets.end();++it_a)
        {
            if (*it == *it_a)

My understanding is that this is testing each active point against each active triangle, so this might loop thousands of times for each active point.

I think this would go a lot faster if you prepared a map from vertices to a list of triangles that used the corresponding vertex. You would then immediately discover all the connected triangles instead of having to search for them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much Peter. I've been beavering away with the help of a colleague to implement your idea and the speed gain is dramatic! On a triangle count of 70,000 I'm down from 9s to .2s. –  jj1962 Jul 11 '13 at 12:12

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