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Is it possible to get the version number programmatically from any .NET DLL?

If yes, how?

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2  
Can't believe this was asked 6 mins ago, was just about to ask the same! –  tpower Nov 18 '09 at 12:03
    
lol - worked for me... –  JL. Nov 18 '09 at 12:50
    
check out this link too for auto incrementing version - blog.mbcharbonneau.com/2007/03/13/… –  JL. Nov 18 '09 at 12:50
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8 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted
Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom("MyAssembly.dll");
Version ver = assembly.GetName().Version;
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This loads MyAssembly.dll into the running AppDomain... bad idea. –  staafl Oct 10 '13 at 13:03
    
@staafl: I felt that's most likely exactly what the OP wanted. If not, there's also "Assembly.ReflectionOnlyLoadFrom" see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Kris Oct 10 '13 at 13:36
3  
I recommend Assemblyname.GetAssemblyName to avoid these issues –  staafl Oct 10 '13 at 13:50
2  
loading an assembly into the appdomain is slow, irreversible (you can't unload it without killing the domain), requires permissions and is liable to cause side effects, such as executing beforefieldinit type initializers, and is just not required in this case. Are these reasons sound enough? –  staafl Oct 10 '13 at 15:34
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@staafl: Yes; not just for me, but also for everybody else reading this page in the future. –  Kris Oct 11 '13 at 12:36
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This works if the dll is .net or Win32. Reflection methods only work if the dll is .net.

// Get the file version for the notepad.
FileVersionInfo myFileVersionInfo = FileVersionInfo.GetVersionInfo(@"C:\MyAssembly.dll");

// Print the file name and version number.
Console.WriteLine("File: " + myFileVersionInfo.FileDescription + '\n' +
                  "Version number: " + myFileVersionInfo.FileVersion);

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.fileversioninfo.fileversion.aspx

original source

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I like this. Why would you bother loading the dll and then use reflection just to get the version, when all you really want to do is this??? –  aggieNick02 Feb 25 '13 at 17:19
    
+1 Excellent, exactly what I needed. –  Andreas Grech Jun 25 '13 at 15:13
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To get it for the assembly that was started (winform, console app, etc...)

using System.Reflection;
...
Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().Version
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GetExecutingAssembly() might also help. –  Bolt Thunder May 27 '13 at 8:57
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Kris, your version works great when needing to load the assembly from the actual DLL file (and if the DLL is there!), however, one will get a much unwanted error if the DLL is EMBEDDED (i.e., not a file but an embedded DLL).

The other thing is, if one uses a versioning scheme with something like "1.2012.0508.0101", when one gets the version string you'll actually get "1.2012.518.101"; note the missing zeros.

So, here's a few extra functions to get the version of a DLL (embedded or from the DLL file):

    public static System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssembly(string pAssemblyName)
    {
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(pAssemblyName)) { return tMyAssembly; }
        tMyAssembly = GetAssemblyEmbedded(pAssemblyName);
        if (tMyAssembly == null) { GetAssemblyDLL(pAssemblyName); }

        return tMyAssembly;
    }//System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)


    public static System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)
    {
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(pAssemblyDisplayName)) { return tMyAssembly; }
        try //try #a
        {
            tMyAssembly = System.Reflection.Assembly.Load(pAssemblyDisplayName);
        }// try #a
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            string m = ex.Message;
        }// try #a
        return tMyAssembly;
    }//System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)


    public static System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssemblyDLL(string pAssemblyNameDLL)
    {
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(pAssemblyNameDLL)) { return tMyAssembly; }
        try //try #a
        {
            if (!pAssemblyNameDLL.ToLower().EndsWith(".dll")) { pAssemblyNameDLL += ".dll"; }
            tMyAssembly = System.Reflection.Assembly.LoadFrom(pAssemblyNameDLL);
        }// try #a
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            string m = ex.Message;
        }// try #a
        return tMyAssembly;
    }//System.Reflection.Assembly GetAssemblyFile(string pAssemblyNameDLL)


    public static string GetVersionStringFromAssembly(string pAssemblyDisplayName)
    {
        string tVersion = "Unknown";
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        tMyAssembly = GetAssembly(pAssemblyDisplayName);
        if (tMyAssembly == null) { return tVersion; }
        tVersion = GetVersionString(tMyAssembly.GetName().Version.ToString());
        return tVersion;
    }//string GetVersionStringFromAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)


    public static string GetVersionString(Version pVersion)
    {
        string tVersion = "Unknown";
        if (pVersion == null) { return tVersion; }
        tVersion = GetVersionString(pVersion.ToString());
        return tVersion;
    }//string GetVersionString(Version pVersion)


    public static string GetVersionString(string pVersionString)
    {
        string tVersion = "Unknown";
        string[] aVersion;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(pVersionString)) { return tVersion; }
        aVersion = pVersionString.Split('.');
        if (aVersion.Length > 0) { tVersion = aVersion[0]; }
        if (aVersion.Length > 1) { tVersion += "." + aVersion[1]; }
        if (aVersion.Length > 2) { tVersion += "." + aVersion[2].PadLeft(4, '0'); }
        if (aVersion.Length > 3) { tVersion += "." + aVersion[3].PadLeft(4, '0'); }

        return tVersion;
    }//string GetVersionString(Version pVersion)


    public static string GetVersionStringFromAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)
    {
        string tVersion = "Unknown";
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        tMyAssembly = GetAssemblyEmbedded(pAssemblyDisplayName);
        if (tMyAssembly == null) { return tVersion; }
        tVersion = GetVersionString(tMyAssembly.GetName().Version.ToString());
        return tVersion;
    }//string GetVersionStringFromAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)


    public static string GetVersionStringFromAssemblyDLL(string pAssemblyDisplayName)
    {
        string tVersion = "Unknown";
        System.Reflection.Assembly tMyAssembly = null;

        tMyAssembly = GetAssemblyDLL(pAssemblyDisplayName);
        if (tMyAssembly == null) { return tVersion; }
        tVersion = GetVersionString(tMyAssembly.GetName().Version.ToString());
        return tVersion;
    }//string GetVersionStringFromAssemblyEmbedded(string pAssemblyDisplayName)
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First of all, there are two possible 'versions' that you might be interested in:

  • the Windows filesystem file version, applicable to all executable files, and

  • the assembly build version, which is embedded in a .NET assembly by the compiler (obviously only applicable to .NET assembly dll and exe files)

In the former case, you should use Ben Anderson's answer; in the latter case, use Assemblyname.GetAssemblyName("c:\path\to\file").Version, or Tataro's answer, in case the assembly is referenced by your code.

Note that you can ignore all the answers that use .Load()/.LoadFrom() methods, since these actually load the assembly in the current AppDomain - which is analogous to cutting down a tree to see how old it is.

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+1 This is a more optimal answer than mine. –  Kris Oct 11 '13 at 12:40
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Here's a nice way using a bit of reflection to get a version of a DLL containing a particular class:

var ver = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(!Class!)).GetName().Version;

Just replace !Class! with the name of a class which is defined in the DLL you wish to get the version of.

This is my preferred method because if I move the DLLs around for different deploys I don't have to change the filepath.

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Note that this only works if the assembly in question is statically referenced by the current one. –  staafl Oct 10 '13 at 13:02
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You can use System.Reflection.Assembly.Load*() methods and then grab their AssemblyInfo.

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var versionAttrib = new AssemblyName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName);
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