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I need to convert an arbitrary amount of milliseconds into Days, Hours, Minutes Second.

For example: 10 Days, 5 hours, 13 minutes, 1 second.

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"The language I'm using does not have this built in, otherwise I'd use it." I find that hard to understand. What language? What OS? –  S.Lott Oct 6 '08 at 18:38
    
ActionScript, any OS, it has miserable date/time support –  FlySwat Oct 6 '08 at 18:40
3  
I don't know of any language that has what he's asking for, nor do I see any reason why it would. Some very simple division/modulus math gets the answer just fine. –  Kip Oct 6 '08 at 18:41
    
Not all years have the same number of days, so you would have to state which period was it. Or maybe, you just want it in 'standard' years (365.something)? –  Milan Babuškov Oct 6 '08 at 18:42
    
@Kip: Got it -- misread the question -- was thinking of OS timestamps in milliseconds. Not delta times or intervals. Tempted to edit the question... –  S.Lott Oct 6 '08 at 20:15

16 Answers 16

up vote 108 down vote accepted

Well, since nobody else has stepped up, I'll write the easy code to do this:

x = ms / 1000
seconds = x % 60
x /= 60
minutes = x % 60
x /= 60
hours = x % 24
x /= 24
days = x

I'm just glad you stopped at days and didn't ask for months. :)

Note that in the above, it is assumed that / represents truncating integer division. If you use this code in a language where / represents floating point division, you will need to manually truncate the results of the division as needed.

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1  
Just used that in a flash function. thanks! (upvoted for simplicity) –  Makram Saleh Aug 19 '09 at 12:45
2  
It does not work correctly. Should use parseInt when using the divisor otherwise you will see long float values. See my answer below for a more comprehensive solution. –  Rajiv Oct 31 '12 at 5:41
    
@Greg Hewgill I'm just glad you stopped at days and didn't ask for months. :) haha :) –  sparrow Nov 28 '12 at 16:06
    
Pure Genius! Thanks! –  Web_Designer Feb 25 '13 at 3:13

Let A be the amount of milliseconds. Then you have:

seconds=(A/1000)%60
minutes=(A/(1000*60))%60
hours=(A/(1000*60*60))%24

and so on (% is the modulus operator).

Hope this helps.

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weird, in hours %24 didnt work but %25 did why is that? –  sabbibJAVA Apr 7 '13 at 10:48
    
@sabbibJAVA 24 should have worked. What language are you in? If / does floating point division, you need to truncate the value. It is assumed in other answers that / is performing integer division. –  Brian J Jun 13 '13 at 13:16

Apache Commons Lang has a DurationFormatUtils that has very helpful methods like formatDurationWords.

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Best answer!!!! –  CelinHC Aug 5 '13 at 14:25

You should use the datetime functions of whatever language you're using, but, just for fun here's the code:

int milliseconds = someNumber;

int seconds = milliseconds / 1000;

int minutes = seconds / 60;

seconds %= 60;

int hours = minutes / 60;

minutes %= 60;

int days = hours / 24;

hours %= 24;
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This is a method I wrote. It takes an integer milliseconds value and returns a human-readable String:

public String convertMS(int ms) {
    int seconds = (int) ((ms / 1000) % 60);
    int minutes = (int) (((ms / 1000) / 60) % 60);
    int hours = (int) ((((ms / 1000) / 60) / 60) % 24);

    String sec, min, hrs;
    if(seconds<10)  sec="0"+seconds;
    else            sec= ""+seconds;
    if(minutes<10)  min="0"+minutes;
    else            min= ""+minutes;
    if(hours<10)    hrs="0"+hours;
    else            hrs= ""+hours;

    if(hours == 0)  return min+":"+sec;
    else    return hrs+":"+min+":"+sec;

}
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Libraries are helpful, but why use a library when you can re-invent the wheel! :)

function getDuration(timeMillis){
    var units = [
        {label:"millis",    mod:1000,},
        {label:"seconds",   mod:60,},
        {label:"minutes",   mod:60,},
        {label:"hours",     mod:24,},
        {label:"days",      mod:7,},
        {label:"weeks",     mod:52,},
    ];
    var duration = new Object();
    var x = timeMillis;
    for (i = 0; i < units.length; i++){
        var tmp = x % units[i].mod;
        duration[units[i].label] = tmp;
        x = (x - tmp) / units[i].mod
    }
    return duration;
}

Creates a "duration" object, with whatever fields you require. Formatting a timestamp then becomes simple...

var duration = getDuration(4773904321); // example time in millis
var str = "";
str += duration.weeks + " weeks, ";
str += duration.days + " days, ";
str += duration.hours + " hours, ";
str += duration.minutes + " mins, ";
str += duration.seconds + " secs, ";
str += duration.millis + " millis";
return str;

Gives you...

"7 weeks, 6 days, 6 hours, 5 mins, 4 secs, 321 millis"
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function convertTime(time) {        
    var millis= time % 1000;
    time = parseInt(time/1000);
    var seconds = time % 60;
    time = parseInt(time/60);
    var minutes = time % 60;
    time = parseInt(time/60);
    var hours = time % 24;
    var out = "";
    if(hours && hours > 0) out += hours + " " + ((hours == 1)?"hr":"hrs") + " ";
    if(minutes && minutes > 0) out += minutes + " " + ((minutes == 1)?"min":"mins") + " ";
    if(seconds && seconds > 0) out += seconds + " " + ((seconds == 1)?"sec":"secs") + " ";
    if(millis&& millis> 0) out += millis+ " " + ((millis== 1)?"msec":"msecs") + " ";
    return out.trim();
}
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I would suggest using whatever date/time functions/libraries your language/framework of choice provides. Also check out string formatting functions as they often provide easy ways to pass date/timestamps and output a human readable string format.

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Long serverUptimeSeconds = 
    (System.currentTimeMillis() - SINCE_TIME_IN_MILLISECONDS) / 1000;


String serverUptimeText = 
String.format("%d days %d hours %d minutes %d seconds",
serverUptimeSeconds / 86400,
( serverUptimeSeconds % 86400) / 3600 ,
((serverUptimeSeconds % 86400) % 3600 ) / 60,
((serverUptimeSeconds % 86400) % 3600 ) % 60
);
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Long expireTime = 69l;
Long tempParam = 0l;

Long seconds = math.mod(expireTime, 60);
tempParam = expireTime - seconds;
expireTime = tempParam/60;
Long minutes = math.mod(expireTime, 60);
tempParam = expireTime - minutes;
expireTime = expireTime/60;
Long hours = math.mod(expireTime, 24);
tempParam = expireTime - hours;
expireTime = expireTime/24;
Long days = math.mod(expireTime, 30);

system.debug(days + '.' + hours + ':' + minutes + ':' + seconds);

This should print: 0.0:1:9

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Your choices are simple:

  1. Write the code to do the conversion (ie, divide by milliSecondsPerDay to get days and use the modulus to divide by milliSecondsPerHour to get hours and use the modulus to divide by milliSecondsPerMinute and divide by 1000 for seconds. milliSecondsPerMinute = 60000, milliSecondsPerHour = 60 * milliSecondsPerMinute, milliSecondsPerDay = 24 * milliSecondsPerHour.
  2. Use an operating routine of some kind. UNIX and Windows both have structures that you can get from a Ticks or seconds type value.
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Take a look at How to convert Milliseconds to “X mins, x seconds” in Java? it suggests to use the java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit class

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FYI, For Java versions below 1.5 or for systems that do not fully support the TimeUnit class (such as Android before API version 9) –  Paresh Mayani Jun 8 '12 at 11:27

I'm not able to comment first answer to your question, but there's a small mistake. You should use parseInt or Math.floor to convert floating point numbers to integer, i

var days, hours, minutes, seconds, x;
x = ms / 1000;
seconds = Math.floor(x % 60);
x /= 60;
minutes = Math.floor(x % 60);
x /= 60;
hours = Math.floor(x % 24);
x /= 24;
days = Math.floor(x);

Personally, I use CoffeeScript in my projects and my code looks like that:

getFormattedTime : (ms)->
        x = ms / 1000
        seconds = Math.floor x % 60
        x /= 60
        minutes = Math.floor x % 60
        x /= 60
        hours = Math.floor x % 24
        x /= 24
        days = Math.floor x
        formattedTime = "#{seconds}s"
        if minutes then formattedTime = "#{minutes}m " + formattedTime
        if hours then formattedTime = "#{hours}h " + formattedTime
        formattedTime 
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This is a solution. Later you can split by ":" and take the values of the array

/**
 * Converts milliseconds to human readeable language separated by ":"
 * Example: 190980000 --> 2:05:3 --> 2days 5hours 3min
 */
function dhm(t){
    var cd = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000,
        ch = 60 * 60 * 1000,
        d = Math.floor(t / cd),
        h = '0' + Math.floor( (t - d * cd) / ch),
        m = '0' + Math.round( (t - d * cd - h * ch) / 60000);
    return [d, h.substr(-2), m.substr(-2)].join(':');
}

var delay = 190980000;                   
var fullTime = dhm(delay);
console.log(fullTime);
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Here is the more precis form in JAVA , I have implement simple logic hope this will help you:

    public String getDuration(String _currentTimemilliSecond)
    {
        long _currentTimeMiles = 1;         
        int x = 0;
        int seconds = 0;
        int minutes = 0;
        int hours = 0;
        int days = 0;
        int month = 0;
        int year = 0;

        try 
        {
            _currentTimeMiles = Long.parseLong(_currentTimemilliSecond);
            /**  x in seconds **/   
            x = (int) (_currentTimeMiles / 1000) ; 
            seconds = x ;

            if(seconds >59)
            {
                minutes = seconds/60 ;

                if(minutes > 59)
                {
                    hours = minutes/60;

                    if(hours > 23)
                    {
                        days = hours/24 ;

                        if(days > 30)
                        {
                            month = days/30;

                            if(month > 11)
                            {
                                year = month/12;

                                Log.d("Year", year);
                                Log.d("Month", month%12);
                                Log.d("Days", days % 30);
                                Log.d("hours ", hours % 24);
                                Log.d("Minutes ", minutes % 60);
                                Log.d("Seconds  ", seconds % 60);   

                                return "Year "+year + " Month "+month%12 +" Days " +days%30 +" hours "+hours%24 +" Minutes "+minutes %60+" Seconds "+seconds%60;
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                Log.d("Month", month);
                                Log.d("Days", days % 30);
                                Log.d("hours ", hours % 24);
                                Log.d("Minutes ", minutes % 60);
                                Log.d("Seconds  ", seconds % 60);   

                                return "Month "+month +" Days " +days%30 +" hours "+hours%24 +" Minutes "+minutes %60+" Seconds "+seconds%60;
                            }

                        }
                        else
                        {
                            Log.d("Days", days );
                            Log.d("hours ", hours % 24);
                            Log.d("Minutes ", minutes % 60);
                            Log.d("Seconds  ", seconds % 60);   

                            return "Days " +days +" hours "+hours%24 +" Minutes "+minutes %60+" Seconds "+seconds%60;
                        }

                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Log.d("hours ", hours);
                        Log.d("Minutes ", minutes % 60);
                        Log.d("Seconds  ", seconds % 60);

                        return "hours "+hours+" Minutes "+minutes %60+" Seconds "+seconds%60;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    Log.d("Minutes ", minutes);
                    Log.d("Seconds  ", seconds % 60);

                    return "Minutes "+minutes +" Seconds "+seconds%60;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Log.d("Seconds ", x);
                return " Seconds "+seconds;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) 
        {
            Log.e(getClass().getName().toString(), e.toString());
        }
        return "";
    }

    private Class Log
    {
        public static void d(String tag , int value)
        {
            System.out.println("##### [ Debug ]  ## "+tag +" :: "+value);
        }
    }
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Here's my solution using TimeUnit.

UPDATE: I should point out that this is written in groovy, but Java is almost identical.

def remainingStr = ""

/* Days */
int days = MILLISECONDS.toDays(remainingTime) as int
remainingStr += (days == 1) ? '1 Day : ' : "${days} Days : "
remainingTime -= DAYS.toMillis(days)

/* Hours */
int hours = MILLISECONDS.toHours(remainingTime) as int
remainingStr += (hours == 1) ? '1 Hour : ' : "${hours} Hours : "
remainingTime -= HOURS.toMillis(hours)

/* Minutes */
int minutes = MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(remainingTime) as int
remainingStr += (minutes == 1) ? '1 Minute : ' : "${minutes} Minutes : "
remainingTime -= MINUTES.toMillis(minutes)

/* Seconds */
int seconds = MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(remainingTime) as int
remainingStr += (seconds == 1) ? '1 Second' : "${seconds} Seconds"
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