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We have a procedure that returns this:

SELECT TOP 15 SearchName, AlternateName, CountryName, StateProvince, Latitude, Longitude, Type, boost + k.Rank as Rank
FROM SearchLocations
    INNER JOIN CONTAINSTABLE([SearchLocations], [SearchName], @Search) AS k
    ON SearchLocations.Id = k.[Key]
ORDER BY Rank DESC

Basically, it full-text searches [SearchLocations] and orders the results based on full-text ranking and the boost column. Problem is, when I search for `ISABOUT("L*" WEIGHT(1.0))', which is what would be given to '@Search' as the input for "L", cities like

  • Lagos Lagos Nigeria
  • Lima Provincia de Lima Peru

show up higher than Los Angeles California United States. While their boost is lower, full-text search gives them a higher ranking because they repeat the same word. This also happens in cases of places that don't repeat words but have the same sub-word multiple times.

How do I disable/work around this?

share|improve this question
1  
If boost is not what you want to rank by, can you explain exactly what you do want to rank by? – Gordon Linoff Jul 9 '13 at 20:57
    
Boost gives preference to larger cities and locations in the US. It is supposed to be a supplement for how well the text matches the query (which is given fairly well by k.Rank from the fulltext search query). – Caleb Jares Jul 9 '13 at 20:59

The algorithm for the full-text index being used by SQL Server is very heavily weighted to give more occurrences of a text match a better rank (bumping them up higher in your results).

From MSDN:

CONTAINSTABLE ranking uses the following algorithm:

StatisticalWeight = Log2( ( 2 + IndexedRowCount ) / KeyRowCount )

Rank = min( MaxQueryRank, HitCount * 16 * StatisticalWeight / MaxOccurrence )

AFAIK this algorithm is completely internal and can't be modified.

As a workaround you might be able to change what the indexer considers "words" and get SQL Server's full-text indexer to ignore spaces between words - so "L*" only gets a HitCount of 1 against "Lima Provincia de Lima Peru" instead of the 2 it gets now, thus lowering the place in the rankings to what you want.

If you want to try it: View or Change Registered Filters and Word Breakers

But then you'll be losing much of the value of full-text search so I don't recommend this.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there an efficient way to implement the same algorithm without hitcount with something like LIKE or CONTAINS? – Caleb Jares Jul 9 '13 at 20:56

Maybe you should just order by the boost column:

SELECT TOP 15 SearchName, AlternateName, CountryName, StateProvince, Latitude, Longitude, Type, boost + k.Rank as Rank
FROM SearchLocations
    INNER JOIN CONTAINSTABLE([SearchLocations], [SearchName], @Search) AS k
    ON SearchLocations.Id = k.[Key]
ORDER BY boost desc;

You don't have to order by the rank just because you are using CONSTAINSTABLE().

share|improve this answer
    
We encountered problems with that as well. For example, Mount Rushmore didn't show up even though it's SQL Rank was 480 and everything else was 60. – Caleb Jares Jul 9 '13 at 20:47
    
I like this approach, but with a couple changes so rank is still useful. MaxRank from ContainsTable is 1000 - so if the boost numbers are scaled to be about the same you might get the result you want e.g. ORDER BY (boost * 10) + k.rank – Ryan Weir Jul 9 '13 at 21:15

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