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Suppose we had this class

Animal.java

public class Animal {

    private String name;

    public Animal(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void shout() {
        /* must be override */
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
}

Driver.java

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Driver {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

    List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();
    animals.add(new Animal("Dog") {

        @Override
        public void shout() {
            System.out.println(getName() + " sounds like: woof woof woof");
        }
    });

    animals.add(new Animal("Cat") {

        @Override
        public void shout() {
            System.out.println(getName() + " sounds like: meow meow meow-ow");
        }
    });

    for(Animal a : animals)
        a.shout();
    }
}

how can i boost me to implement the method shout() or any other programmer? Suppose that there is no reason to make the Animal class abstract, and make a class for Dog,Cat, etc.. that extends Animal

Is there a design pattern?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Brian Roach, Daniel Kaplan, Sotirios Delimanolis, juanformoso, Robert Harvey Aug 5 '13 at 18:57

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Sorry, but as your question stands, it is hard to tell exactly what you're asking. Please clarify by editing it. – gparyani Jul 9 '13 at 19:38
    
You're misusing the word pretend. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 9 '13 at 19:41
1  
@SotiriosDelimanolis Now he's replaced the word "pretend" with "boost". Still doesn't make sense. – gparyani Jul 9 '13 at 21:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

mmm a Strategy pattern could help you.

public class Animal {

   private Shoutable shoutable;  
   private String name;

    public Animal(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void shout() {
        shoutable.shout();
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setShout(Shoutable shoutable){
       this.shoutable=shoutable;
    }
}


public interface Shoutable{
  void shout();
}

public class DogShout implements Shoutable{
  @Override
  public void shout{
   System.out.println("woff gua guaa gua woff");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
does this offer the same functionality as action listeners?for example: JTextField jtf = new JTextField(); jtf.addActionListener(new ActionListener() { @Override public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub } }); – oufff Jul 9 '13 at 19:48
    
yep, and then you have to inject to the animal class (by constructor or setter).. and decouple algorithm from animal class – nachokk Jul 9 '13 at 19:51
    
yes! that's it! thank you! – oufff Jul 9 '13 at 19:59
    
@Re4cTiV3 consider accepting the answer :), strategy is for algorithm i know this simple string can be doing as Avi suggest, but i think that you were abstract in your question to simplify – nachokk Jul 9 '13 at 20:03

You could implement shout() in the base class and add method voice() that returns the voice of the animal.

Like this:

public class Animal {

private String voice;

private String name;

public Animal(String name, String voide) {
    this.name = name;
    this.voice = voice;
}

public void shout() {
    System.out.println(getName() + " sounds like: "+ getVoice());
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public String getVoice() { return voice }
}

In the code that creates animals:

animals.add(new Animal("Dog", "woof"));

animals.add(new Animal("Cat", "meow");
share|improve this answer

If you want Cat and Dog to do the things that Animal does without animal being Abstract, you can.

public class Cat extends Animal

that will work if Animal is Abstract or a normal, fully implemented class. You would use implements instead of extends for an interface.

share|improve this answer

You can do the following:

public class Animal {

    private String name;
    private Shoutable shoutable;

    public Animal(String name, Shoutable shoutable) {
        this.name = name;
        this.shoutable = shoutable;
    }

    public void shout() {
        shoutable.shout();
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
}

The Shoutable interface:

public interface Shoutable {
    void shout();
}

And have a shoutable implementation as anonymous inner class:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Driver {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

    List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();
    animals.add(new Animal("Dog", new Shoutable() {
              @Override
              public void shout() {
                   System.out.println(getName() + " sounds like: woof woof woof");
              }
         });

    animals.add(new Animal("Cat", new Shoutable() {

        @Override
        public void shout() {
            System.out.println(getName() + " sounds like: meow meow meow-ow");
        }
    });

    for(Animal a : animals)
        a.shout();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you :) exactly what was i looking – oufff Jul 9 '13 at 19:58
    
Sababa. Take into account that anonymous inner class will be created each time you invoke "new Shoutable() { ... }". If the code section should be optimized (performance wise), it's better to create a class for each one. – Elad Tabak Jul 9 '13 at 20:02
    
@Elad Not necessarily. Anonymous inner classes are generated statically at compile time under names like Driver$1 and Driver$2 in this case. Whenever such a code segment is reached, only a new instance of such a class is created. Also, if this is Java 7, I suggest you use the new "diamond" syntax: List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<>() to save typing. – gparyani Jul 9 '13 at 21:49
    
@Re4cTiV3 If this is what you are looking for, you should accept this answer by clicking the green checkmark to mark this as the "official" answer to the question for people that look at your question. – gparyani Jul 9 '13 at 21:53
    
@gparyani I meant a new instance of class, which is not so efficient as you may better create a dedicated class (like DogShouatable in the above example) in case the code section is critical. Otherwise, it's premature optimization and should be avoided. – Elad Tabak Jul 31 '13 at 13:01

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