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I have a test map with pair of std::string and Person pointer

class MyMap {
public:
    void clear() {
       std::for_each(people.begin(), people.end(),std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&MyMap::remove), this));
    }
    void remove(std::pair<std::string, Person*> p) { delete p.second; }
private:
    std::map<name, Person*> people;
};

My question is does for_each pass each Person pair by ref or value? is it worth using my own, this is a bit cleaner.

In addition to that if I want to use boost::bind or std::bind (c++11) instead of bind1st, how would I do it? should this function be like struct having operator() that inherits std::unary_function?

share|improve this question
    
"for_each pass each Person pair by ref or value": pass where?if you are talking about the function(3rd argument) it depends on how the function definition is. –  Aman Deep Gautam Jul 9 '13 at 20:29
    
looking at current func. for_each wouldn't accept signature void remove(std::pair<std::string, Person*>& p) complains about overloading –  mkhan3189 Jul 9 '13 at 20:32
    
Why does it matter? all your remove function does is delete the Person. –  Wug Jul 9 '13 at 20:33
2  
If you have access to C++11, rather than bothering with std::bind just use the range-based version of for. –  zindorsky Jul 9 '13 at 20:34
1  
@dev-inside. Yep. But you should probably not be storing a pointer. std::unique_ptr? –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '13 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The type of the map is std::map<name, Person*>, but the parameter for the remove function is std::pair<std::string, Person*>. This won't work unless name is typedef for std::string.

The way your remove function is currently defined, you'll make copies of the map's value_type. Change the function signature to:

void remove(std::pair<const std::string, Person *>& p)
//                    ^^^^^                       ^
//                    key must be const           take a reference

To use std::bind instead of std::bind1st

std::for_each( people.begin(), 
               people.end(), 
               std::bind( &MyMap::remove, this, std::placeholders::_1 ) );

But if you can use C++11 features, there's no need for std::bind, lambda is much nicer.

std::for_each( people.begin(), 
               people.end(), 
               []( decltype(*people.begin())& p ) { delete p.second; } );

or use a range based for loop

for( auto&& p : people ) {
    delete p.second;
}
share|improve this answer

for_each will call the functor either by-value or by-reference, depending on how you have defined the functor.

For example:

struct Gizmo
{
  bool operator() (const Zippy& rhs) const
  {
    // ...
  }
};

This functor is call-by-ref. However:

struct Gizmo
{
  bool operator() (Zippy rhs) const
  {
    // ...
  }
};

This one is call-by-value.

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Yup I know that but passing this in std::for_each causes compilation error :13: required from ‘void MyMap::clear()’ ../src/main.cc:45:34: required from here /usr/include/c++/4.7/backward/binders.h:125:7: error: ‘typename _Operation::result_type std::binder1st<_Operation>::operator()(typename _Operation::second_argument_type&) const [with _Operation = std::mem_fun1_t<void, MyMap, Person*&>; typename _Operation::result_type = void; typename _Operation::second_argument_type = Person*&]’ cannot be overloaded –  mkhan3189 Jul 9 '13 at 20:41
    
Show us 'Person` and name –  John Dibling Jul 9 '13 at 20:58

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