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Is there a general, efficient way to assign values to a subset of a DataFrame in pandas? I've got hundreds of rows and columns that I can access directly but I haven't managed to figure out how to edit their values without iterating through each row,col pair. For example:

In [1]: import pandas, numpy

In [2]: array = numpy.arange(30).reshape(3,10)

In [3]: df = pandas.DataFrame(array, index=list("ABC"))

In [4]: df
Out[4]: 
    0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
A   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
B  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19
C  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29

In [5]: rows = ['A','C']

In [6]: columns = [1,4,7]

In [7]: df[columns].ix[rows]
Out[7]: 
    1   4   7
A   1   4   7
C  21  24  27

In [8]: df[columns].ix[rows] = 900

In [9]: df
Out[9]: 
    0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
A   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
B  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19
C  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29

I believe what is happening here is that I'm getting a copy rather than a view, meaning I can't assign to the original DataFrame. Is that my problem? What's the most efficient way to edit those rows x columns (preferably in-pace, as the DataFrame may take up a lot of memory)?

Also, what if I want to replace those values with a correctly shaped DataFrame?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use loc in an assignment expression (the = means it's not relevant whether it is a view or a copy!):

In [11]: df.loc[rows, columns] = 99

In [12]: df
Out[12]:
    0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
A   0  99   2   3  99   5   6  99   8   9
B  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19
C  20  99  22  23  99  25  26  99  28  29

If you're using a version prior to 0.11 you can use .ix.

As @Jeff comments:

This is an assignment expression (see 'advanced indexing with ix' section of the docs) and doesn't return anything (although there are assignment expressions which do return things, e.g. .at and .iat).

df.loc[rows,columns] can return a view, but usually it's a copy. Confusing, but done for efficiency.

Bottom line: use ix, loc, iloc to set (as above), and don't modify copies.

See 'view versus copy' section of the docs.

share|improve this answer
    
I get an attribute error for df.loc. I assume this is new in pandas 0.11. Was there an equivalent before, or is this why I need to upgrade pandas every other month? –  Noah Jul 9 '13 at 20:41
    
Also, does it describe somewhere in the docs that this is a view, not a copy? See pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/… –  Noah Jul 9 '13 at 20:43
    
Definitely the docs need to extend more about when it's a view or a copy, I've said I would add some docs myself in the past (just need to work out all the ins and outs), will make a github issue to get the ball rolling... –  Andy Hayden Jul 9 '13 at 20:48
    
@Noah Alternative is to use .ix (.loc is less ambiguous). Definitely recommend updating pandas (every other month) to the latest stable version :) 0.12 will be out next week. –  Andy Hayden Jul 9 '13 at 20:52
1  
Just to expand on @AndyHayden answer. This does not a view or a copy, it is an assignment expression, so it doesn't return anything (FYI occasionally there are assignement expressions that DO return things, e.g. .at/.iat). However, df.loc[rows,columns] can return a view (more generally its a copy). Confusing, but done for efficiency. Bottom line, is to use ix/loc/iloc to set, and don't modify copies. –  Jeff Jul 9 '13 at 22:35

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