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I am trying to locate elements with the class "foo"

<div id="foo1">
<div id = "foo2">
<div class = "foo">
</div>
</div>
</div>

This is my xpath:

/div/div/div[contains(@class,'foo')]

And this is the code it's finding:

<div id="foo1">
<div id = "foo2">
<div class = "foo-err">
</div>
</div>
</div>

The path is returning the div class = "foo-err" element

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

contains() is a substring match. It's basically saying "if 'foo' is ANYWHERE in the class attribute, match the element".

If you want an exact match, then try

[@class='foo']
share|improve this answer
    
Would the xpath then be : /div/div/div[@class='foo'] – megaxelize Jul 9 '13 at 20:49
    
Yes it works! Thanks! – megaxelize Jul 9 '13 at 20:50
1  
The moral of the tale: don't assume you can guess what a function does from its name alone. – Michael Kay Jul 9 '13 at 21:49
1  
@MichaelKay Actually, the moral of the tale is "the function's name probably describes exactly what it does". :-) – Ross Patterson Jul 9 '13 at 22:54
    
Yeah once finding out what it does I did think ah of course...contains – megaxelize Jul 9 '13 at 23:06

If you need to match foo in a list of classes but not foo-err, you need a more-complex construct: [contains(concat(' ', @class, ' '), ' foo ')], which will look for foo surrounded by spaces in the full class string also surrounded by spaces. Thus 'foo bar' -> ' foo bar ' -> contains ' foo ', but 'foobaz bar' -> ' foobaz bar ' -> does not contain ' foo '.

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