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I'm looking to create a function that works similarly to the way ActiveRecord::Base's find_by_'column_name' works. For example, if I do something like

User.find_by_address("1234 Apple Road")

it will look up via the address column. But I'm perplexed as to how it works.

I see both self.prefix and self.suffix when I look at the code for "dynamic matchers" in the code, e.g. here, but in my research I can't find anything about self.prefix or self.suffix for Ruby.

How would I create this kind of function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It uses method_missing, which is a callback that Ruby provides when a method with an unrecognised name is called. This is the standard way to create methods with dynamic names in Ruby.

The first argument passed to it is a Symbol representing the name of the method, and it then receives every argument passed to the unrecognised method.

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Let's say you have a zoo, a very nice zoo, with a bunch of wild animals. Of course, as a zoo keeper, you often needs to find specific animals based on their needs and characteristics. But as the zoo grow and grow, it's impossible to know in advance what will be these characteristics! Let's try to fix this...

First, let's define what is an animal;

class Animal
  def initialize(attributes)
    @attributes = attributes
  end

  def [](value)
    @attributes[value]
  end
end

Easy enough. Now, let's build the zoo!

class Zoo
  def animals
    @animals ||= []
  end
end

What is a zoo without any animals?

zoo = Zoo.new

zoo.animals << Animal.new(type: "Mighty Giraffe", legs: 4, region: 'Africa')
zoo.animals << Animal.new(type: "Fierce Pidgin", legs: 2, region: 'America')
zoo.animals << Animal.new(type: "Wild Boar", legs: 4, region: 'Africa')

Perfect. We now have a zoo full of animals. Now, we know they all have their specific characteristics, but we're still unable to find them... Wouldn't it be great to be able to search our animals like this?

zoo.find_animals_by_region('Africa')

But remember, we don't know in advance all these characteristics! Let's try to fix this by adding a special method to our zoo.

class Zoo
  def animals
    @@animals ||= []
  end

  def method_missing(method_name, *args, &block)
    # stuff here
  end
end

Great, we can now catch all calls to undefined methods on our zoo, which mean that find_animals_by_something will be catch right away, as it is undefined! Moreover, we even get the method_name that was used. Great! Let's use this to our advantage.

class Zoo
  def animals
    @@animals ||= []
  end

  def method_missing(method_name, *args, &block)
    if method_name.to_s.start_with?('find_animals_by_')
      # here we go!
    end
  end
end

Here we go! We now catch only missing methods that starts with the special keyword "find_animals_by_". Let's add a little logic in there, and don't forget to call super for unwanted methods!

class Zoo
  def animals
    @@animals ||= []
  end

  def method_missing(method_name, *args, &block)
    if method_name.to_s.start_with?('find_animals_by_')
      find_animals_by_attribute(method_name[16..-1], args[0])
    else
      super(method_name, *args, &block)
    end
  end

  def find_animals_by_attribute(attribute, value)
    animals.select{ |animal| animal[attribute.to_sym] == value }
  end
end

Done! A fully functional zoo in which we can search our animals!

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