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I know the concept of register variable and it's use cases but there are few questions in my mind based on what I have tried.

  1. I cannot access the address of a register variable in C though I can do it C++! Why? Is there any issue in accessing the addressing of a register variable?

  2. Suppose if I declare a string variable in C++ as register, then where will that variable be stored? What is the point in declaring the storage class of non-numeric data types such as 'string' in C++ to be register??

UPDATE: I thought that C++ allows us to fetch the address of a register variable, as I was not getting any error in my program which is as follows:

#include<iostream>
#include<time.h>

using namespace std;

clock_t beg, en;

int main(){

    int j, k=0;

    beg=clock();
    for(register int i=0;i<10000000;i++){
        /*if(k==0){
            cout<<&i<<endl;    // if this code is uncommented, then C++ rejects the recommendation to make 'i' as register
            k++;
        }*/
    }
    en=clock();

    cout<<en-beg<<endl;

    cout<<&j<<endl<<&k;

    return 0;
}

What I have observed is, if I make the variable 'i' as register and don't try to print the address using '&i' then C++ accepts the recommendation and stores 'i' in register, this can be infered from running time of for loop which will always be around 4-12 ms if 'i' is in register. But if I try to print address of variable 'i' then though I don't get any error but C++ rejects the recommendation and this can be infered from the time of execution of loop which is always more than 25 if i is not register!!

So, basically I cannot fetch address of a variable with storage class as register in both C as well as C++!! WHY?

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3  
Register variables don't have addresses. – chris Jul 9 '13 at 23:07
6  
"I know the concept of register variable". NO YOU DONT'T!!! – John3136 Jul 9 '13 at 23:09
1  
@stalin, Consider assembly, where registers and memory addresses are very distinct. Now consider that the compiler turns your code into assembly. – chris Jul 9 '13 at 23:12
2  
@stalin: The compiler doesn't usually make decisions about what to store in cache, because the processor does it in hardware. (That's not to say you can't, but on most architectures everything you access will get stored in cache unless you use special instructions that bypass the cache). – Dietrich Epp Jul 9 '13 at 23:30
1  
@stalin Your behavior is. – Jim Balter Jul 9 '13 at 23:45
up vote 9 down vote accepted

C and C++ are different languages.

  • In C, you cannot take the address of a variable with register storage. Cf. C11 6.7.1/6:

    A declaration of an identifier for an object with storage-class specifier register suggests that access to the object be as fast as possible. The extent to which such suggestions are effective is implementation-defined.

    Footnote: The implementation may treat any register declaration simply as an auto declaration. [...]

  • In C++, register is a deprecated, meaningless keyword that has no effect (except perhaps serve as a compiler hint), and variables declared as register still just have automatic storage. In particular, C++ doesn't have a "register" storage class. (It just has the storage class specifier, inherited from C.) Cf. C++11, 7.1.1/3:

    A register specifier is a hint to the implementation that the variable so declared will be heavily used. [ Note: The hint can be ignored and in most implementations it will be ignored if the address of the variable is taken. This use is deprecated [...]

Even in C nothing is actually guaranteed about how register storage is implemented (implementations are free to treat register as auto), but the language rules apply regardless.

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1  
@stalin: Are you comparing optimized builds? – Kerrek SB Jul 9 '13 at 23:32
5  
@stalin: I call bullshit on that. I just compared with g++ -O3, and both versions produce identical code. (Though there is a difference for -O0. But what good is talking C++ without optimizations. Think of register as a localized compiler pragma if you will.) – Kerrek SB Jul 9 '13 at 23:35
2  
@stalin "What are you talking about?" -- This is not a good thing to say to Kerrek, who is extremely knowledgeable. "how does my code shows significant improvement in time when i is declared register (and &i not used) ?" -- It doesn't. Generate the asm code and look. – Jim Balter Jul 9 '13 at 23:39
1  
@KerrekSB: Thanks for your help and patience while explaining me. I apologise for my behavior. You really have more knowledge and experience than me, I was really talking shit!! – stalin Jul 10 '13 at 17:39
1  
@stalin: Don't worry about it :-) What matters is that you noticed something, measured, and wanted to find out more. That's always a good thing. – Kerrek SB Jul 10 '13 at 18:45

First, let's take a look at the relevant standards. It's always possible that C and C++ have different meanings for this keyword.

C++ 2011 Section 7.1.1 Paragraphs 2 and 3:

The register specifier shall be applied only to names of variables declared in a block (6.3) or to function parameters (8.4). It specifies that the named variable has automatic storage duration (3.7.3). A variable declared without a storage-class-specifier at block scope or declared as a function parameter has automatic storage duration by default.

A register specifier is a hint to the implementation that the variable so declared will be heavily used. [ Note: The hint can be ignored and in most implementations it will be ignored if the address of the variable is taken. This use is deprecated (see D.2). — end note ]

C 2011 Section 6.7.1 Paragraph 6 and Footnote 121:

A declaration of an identifier for an object with storage-class specifier register suggests that access to the object be as fast as possible. The extent to which such suggestions are effective is implementation-defined.)

The implementation may treat any register declaration simply as an auto declaration. However, whether or not addressable storage is actually used, the address of any part of an object declared with storage-class specifier register cannot be computed, either explicitly (by use of the unary & operator as discussed in 6.5.3.2) or implicitly (by converting an array name to a pointer as discussed in 6.3.2.1). Thus, the only operators that can be applied to an array declared with storage-class specifier register are sizeof and _Alignof.

So, let's take away what we've learned here.

  • In C++, the register keyword has no meaning. It does function as a compiler hint, but it's suggested that most compilers will ignore that hint anyways.
  • In C, the register keyword retains a meaning. Here, we are not, for example, allowed to take the address of an object (see the quoted footnote). An implementation may ignore the register hint, and place the object in memory anyways, but the keyword does restrict what you can do with the object. These restrictions should enable a compiler to better optimize access to the object, but it's also possible (like it is suggested in the C++ case), that the compiler will be able to infer this anyways.

As to what you're seeing in practice:

  • We can see why you're getting the syntax error in C when you try to take the address of a register int, so let's move past that.
  • You claim to be seeing a performance difference in C++ depending on whether or not you use register. In this case, it would be good to show your test, because there may be problems in the test itself. If the full test is fine, then it certainly is possible that your compiler is using the hint to produce better code.
  • The code you've shown is certainly odd though. That's because a compiler under optimizations will likely just remove the entire for loop from the code. The for loop has no side-effects. It's likely (and preferred) that a compiler will return identical code (that is, no code) with for (int i=0; i<100; ++i){} and for (register int i=0; i<100; ++i) {}.
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Taking the address of a variable will FORCE the compiler to store it in a memory (unless it's an architecure where registers has an address - I think the TI 9900 series processors were implemented this way, but it's a vague memory from ca 1984). If you have told the compiler to use a register, that makes it incompatible. Although the C++ standard seems to suggest that the compiler isn't obliged to tell you so, and can in fact ignore the register keyword.

C++11 draft n3337, section 7.1.1, bullet 3

A register specifier is a hint to the implementation that the variable so declared will be heavily used. [ Note: The hint can be ignored and in most implementations it will be ignored if the address of the variable is taken. This use is deprecated (see D.2). — end note ]

(Edit: Yes, the TMS 9900 does indeed have "registers in memory", so theoretically, you can have the address of a register in that architecture - but the architecture is much more that "registers live in memory (which has an address)" than "registers have addresses").

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C compilers are also free to ignore the register keyword other than to enforce the restriction that you can't take the variable's address. Since register no longer requires that a variable occupies a register (it's been decades since it did), it's a completely pointless restriction, which is why C++ dropped it. However, because the keyword is "register" and not, say "fast", it causes confusion. – Jim Balter Jul 9 '13 at 23:36

Precisely because it's a register. An address is an address of a memory location. If something is resident in a register it is by definition not in main memory.

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SO registers don't have addresses? How come computer knows then in which register variable 'i' is stored? – stalin Jul 9 '13 at 23:12
    
@stalin not sure that's a very meaningful question. When your code gets compiled, there is no variable called i in the output. It's just a bunch of assembly opcodes and memory addresses. It is the compiler that generates the instructions performing the operations on i. – greatwolf Jul 9 '13 at 23:18
    
@stalin Right, registers don't have addresses. Instead, they are numbered by small integers, and these numbers usually are part of the actual machine instruction. – Jim Balter Jul 9 '13 at 23:43

The basic answer is that, on most architectures, general purpose registers do not have memory addresses. In general, a pointer is simply a (virtual) memory address of the memory location containing the object. This is done of efficiency.

It would be possible to extend the concept of a pointer to point to memory or register. However, doing so would decrease program speed as the code to dereference a pointer would need to check what type of location is being pointer to.

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