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For each of our binary assets we generate a MD5 hash. This is used to check whether a certain binary asset is already in our application. But is it possible that two different binary assets generate the same MD5 hast. So is it possible that two different strings generate the same MD5 hash?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 57 down vote accepted

For a set of even billions of assets, the chances of random collisions are negligibly small -- nothing that you should worry about. Considering the birthday paradox, given a set of 2^64 (or 18,446,744,073,709,551,616) assets, the probability of a single MD5 collision within this set is 50%. At this scale, you'd probably beat Google in terms of storage capacity.

However, because the MD5 hash function has been broken (it's vulnerable to a collision attack), any determined attacker can produce 2 colliding assets in a matter of seconds worth of CPU power. So if you want to use MD5, make sure that such an attacker would not compromise the security of your application!

Also, consider the ramifications if an attacker could forge a collision to an existing asset in your database. While there are no such known attacks (preimage attacks) against MD5 (as of 2011), it could become possible by extending the current research on collision attacks.

If these turn out to be a problem, I suggest looking at the SHA-2 series of hash functions (SHA-256, SHA-384 and SHA-512). The downside is that it's slightly slower and has longer hash output.

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3  
'Days' is a massive overstatement at this point, as I understand it. –  Nick Johnson Nov 18 '09 at 15:41
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True, I updated my post. The 2004 random collision attack is very fast indeed. The 2007 MD5 prefix collision attack can take days -- but is generally much more useful to an attacker –  intgr Nov 18 '09 at 15:53
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See Rubens' answer for a working example that will generate a collision between two different executables in a matter of hours. :) –  Nick Johnson Nov 18 '09 at 16:08
    
Thanks, you are right. –  intgr Nov 18 '09 at 16:23

MD5 is a hash function – so yes, two different strings can absolutely generate colliding MD5 codes.

In particular, note that MD5 codes have a fixed length so the possible number of MD5 codes is limited. The number of strings (of any length), however, is definitely unlimited so it logically follows that there must be collisions.

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Yes, it is possible. This is in fact a Birthday problem. However the probability of two randomly chosen strings having the same MD5 hash is very low.

See this and this questions for examples.

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1  
What probability? That of collision? No, that would be 1, i.e. very high. ;-) –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 18 '09 at 13:40
    
Well, true. There surely exist two strings with the same MD5 hash. –  sharptooth Nov 18 '09 at 13:41
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I've known this as the pigeon-hole problem. –  Daniel A. White Nov 18 '09 at 13:51
    
    
the birthday problem just concerns the liklyhood of a collision. for proof there must be one you want the pidgeon hole principle –  jk. Nov 18 '09 at 13:56

Yes, of course: MD5 hashes have a finite length, but there are an infinite number of possible character strings that can be MD5-hashed.

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About MD5 collision examples: MD5 Collision Demo and MD5 Collisions, Visualised

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Yes, it is possible. It is called a Hash collision.

Having said that, algorithms such as MD5 are designed to minimize the probability of a collision.

The Wikipedia entry on MD5 explains some vulnerabilities in MD5, which you should be aware of.

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Just to be more informative. From a math point of view, Hash functions are not injective.
It means that there is not a 1 to 1 (but one way) relationship between the starting set and the resulting one.

Bijection on wikipedia

EDIT: to be complete injective hash functions exist: it's called Perfect hashing.

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There is no perfect hashing function when the output size is smaller than the input size. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 3 '11 at 1:31

Yes, it is! Collision will be a possibility (although, the risk is very small). If not, you would have a pretty effective compression method!

EDIT: As Konrad Rudolph says: A potentially unlimited set of input converted to a finite set of output (32 hex chars) will results in an endless number of collisions.

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As other people have said, yes, there can be collisions between two different inputs. However, in your use case, I don't see that being a problem. I highly doubt that you will run into collisions - I've used MD5 for fingerprinting hundreds of thousands of image files of a number of image (JPG, bitmap, PNG, raw) formats at a previous job and I didn't have a collision.

However, if you are trying to fingerprint some kind of data, perhaps you could use two hash algorithms - the odds of one input resulting in the same output of two different algorithms is near impossible.

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1  
Actually, if an attacker can produce collisions with one hash algorithm, he can use this to also get collisions for a second algorithm. This was recently discussed on my question at crypto.stackexchange. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 3 '11 at 1:35

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