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What's the difference between ++$i and $i++ in PHP?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 48 down vote accepted

++$i is pre-increment whilst $i++ post-increment.

  • pre-increment: increment variable i first and then de-reference.
  • post-increment: de-reference and then increment i

"Take advantage of the fact that PHP allows you to post-increment ($i++) and pre-increment (++$i). The meaning is the same as long as you are not writing anything like $j = $i++, however pre-incrementing is almost 10% faster, which means that you should switch from post- to pre-incrementing when you have the opportunity, especially in tight loops and especially if you're pedantic about micro-optimisations!" - TuxRadar

For further clarification, post-incrementation in PHP has been documented as storing a temporary variable which attributes to this 10% overhead vs. pre-incrementation.

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5  
Is this a general rule of thumb, or is it PHP specific. – Zoidberg Nov 18 '09 at 13:42
2  
I wouldn't generalize to some other language myself. – jldupont Nov 18 '09 at 13:44
2  
The speed increase of pre-incrementation is PHP specific due to the fact that post-increment creates a temporary variable, creating overhead. – cballou Nov 18 '09 at 13:54
3  
@knittl Remember that it is 10% of a (one hopes) very quick operation :) – jensgram Nov 18 '09 at 14:07
1  
Doesn't Zend PHP and/or Facebook PHP optimize $i++ to ++$i in for loops? Why some stupid team leads still ask to use ++$i in for loops? – happy_marmoset Oct 10 '13 at 13:41

++$i is pre-incrementation

  1. $i is incremented
  2. the new value is returned

$i++ is post-incrementation

  1. the value of $i copied to an internal temporary variable
  2. $i is incremented
  3. the internal copy of the old value of $i is returned
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This answer is the most clear explanation of the difference between prefix and postfix increments. Thank you for this. – Solace May 21 '15 at 17:18

++$i increments $i, but evaluates to the value of $i+1 $i++ increments $i, but evaluates to the old value of $i.

Here's an example:

$i = 10;
$a = $i++;
// Now $a is 10, and $i is 11

$i = 10;
$a = ++$i;
// Now $a is 11, and $i is 11

There is sometimes a slight preformance cost for using $i++. See, when you do something like

$a = $i++;

You're really doing this:

$temporary_variable = $i;
$i=$i+1;
$a=$temporary_variable;
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++$i //first increment $i then run line
$i++ //first run line then increment $i 
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Thats technically an oversimplification - think of a for loop etc. – Antony Carthy Nov 18 '09 at 13:50

Difference is: ++$i will increment $i variable and return updated value, while $i++ will return original value, so increment it.

$prefix = 1;
$postfix = 1;
echo ++$prefix;   // 2
echo $postfix++;  // 1
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in this case there is no difference:

for($i = 0;$i<3;++$i)var_dump $i;
/*
int(0)
int(1)
int(2)
*/
for($i = 0;$i<3;$i++)var_dump $i;
/*
int(0)
int(1)
int(2)
*/

but:

for($i = 0;$i<3; $j = ++$i )var_dump($j);
/*
NULL
int(1)
int(2)
*/
for($i = 0;$i<3; $j = $i++ )var_dump($j);
/*
NULL
int(0)
int(1)
*/
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This is useful, the the prefix increment seems to have the least surprise. I'm going to switch to always using prefix increment now. – CMCDragonkai Jun 26 '15 at 13:24

To explain jldupont's point:

$i = 1;
$x = $i++;
echo $x; // prints 1
$x = ++$i;
echo $x; // prints 3
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Another way of looking at pre and post incrementing is that it's shorthand for combining 2 statements.

Pre-incrementing

// long form
$y = $y + 1;
$x = $y; // any statement using $y

// shorthand
$x = ++$y; // the same statement using $y

Post-incrementing

// long form
$x = $y; // any statement using $y
$y = $y + 1;

// shorthand
$x = $y++; // the same statement using $y
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The main purpose of the post-fix increment operator is usage like this:

while(*condition*)
    $array[$i++] = $something;

This is a very elegant way, how to get around some array iterations. Breakdown:

  1. Variable $something will be assigned to the array element indexed with $i
  2. Variable $i will be incremented
  3. Iteration is at the end, condition will be checked

In all other cases, you should use the prefix operator. It makes the code much more clear (You can be sure, that you already work with the incremented value of particular variable).

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Upvoted for recommending to use prefix unless a postfix is strictly needed. – developerbmw May 14 at 20:36

It's probably best-illustrated by an example...

Post-increment:

$zero = 0;
$n = $zero++; //$n is zero

Pre-increment:

$zero = 0;
$n = ++$zero; //$n is one
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Short answer:

  • Prefix increases the value and returns the value increased
  • Postfix increases the value and returns the value before it was increased
  • Prefix is faster

Long answer: If you think a little about it, how you would implement those yourself, you will probably realize why prefix is faster. Truth to be told, postfix is actually (often) implemented using prefix:

const T T::operator ++ (int) // postfix
    {
    T orig(*this);
    ++(*this); // call prefix operator
    return (orig);
    }

Avoid postfix unless you have a specific reason not to. The difference in speed can be quite a lot for complex datatypes.

I actually looked this up a few days ago. Heres my source.

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I ran the following code to test if ++$i is 10% faster than $i++. I admit, the code does not have a stable outcome but even then I should at least have seen some numbers near the 10%. The highest I got was 4-4.5% approximately.

<?php

$randomFloat = rand(0, 10) / 10;

$before1 = microtime(true);

for($i=0; $i <1000000; ++$i){
    $rand = (rand(0, 10) / 10) * (rand(0, 10) / 10);
}

$after1 = microtime(true);
echo 'it took '.($after1-$before1) . ' seconds fot ++$i<br />';

$before2 = microtime(true);

for($i=0; $i <1000000; $i++){
    $rand = (rand(0, 10) / 10) * (rand(0, 10) / 10);
}

$after2 = microtime(true);
echo 'it took '.($after2-$before2) . ' seconds fot $i++<br /><br />';

echo '++$i is '.((($after1-$before1)*100)/($after2-$before2)-100).'% faster than $i++';
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