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I am stuck at a failry simple looping exercise through lists and getting error "TypeError: 'list' object is not callable". I have three lists with n number of records. I want to write first record from all lists in the same line and want to repeat this procedure for n number of records, it will result in n number of lines. Following are lists that I want to use:

lst1 = ['1','2','4','5','3']
lst2 = ['3','4','3','4','3']
lst3 = ['0.52','0.91','0.18','0.42','0.21']

istring=""
lst=0
for i in range(0,10): # range is simply upper limit of number of records in lists
    entry = lst1(lst)
    istring = istring + entry.rjust(11) # first entry from each list will be cat here
    lst=lst+1

Any startup would be really helpful.

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1  
I think you just mean lst1[lst] –  kojiro Jul 10 '13 at 1:21
1  
Create a list of lists and then loop over them. –  Scrooj Jul 10 '13 at 1:24
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
>>> lst1 = ['1','2','4','5','3']
>>> lst2 = ['3','4','3','4','3']
>>> lst3 = ['0.52','0.91','0.18','0.42','0.21']
>>> a = zip(lst1, lst2, lst3)
>>> istring = ""
>>> for entry in a:
...     istring += entry[0].rjust(11)
...     istring += entry[1].rjust(11)
...     istring += entry[2].rjust(11) + "\n"
... 
>>> print istring
          1          3       0.52
          2          4       0.91
          4          3       0.18
          5          4       0.42
          3          3       0.21
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Thanks. This is exactly what I want except the only thing is that I don't know the number of records in the lists after each run of the earlier script. How to take care of that? –  Ibe Jul 10 '13 at 1:36
    
@Ibe Are you trying to print out the line number with each line? You can get the count for each iteration of the for loop by doing for index,entry in iter(a): where index will be the current loop count. –  Mike Jul 10 '13 at 1:38
    
no, I don't want the count of lines except only want to automate "entry[0], entry[1]...." without writing [0], [1],... as I don't know the number of records after each run. –  Ibe Jul 10 '13 at 1:48
1  
@Ibe The indexes [0], [1], [2] refer the number of lists, not the number of records in each list. –  dansalmo Jul 10 '13 at 2:58
    
That clears the confusion. And how to index records in [0]? –  Ibe Jul 10 '13 at 4:51
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Try entry = lst1[lst] instead of entry = lst1(lst)

() usually denotes calling a function, whereas

[] usually denotes accessing an element of something.

A list is not a function.

Also, while you can keep your own index, a for loop makes this unnecessary

x = [1,2,3,4,5,7,9,11,13,15]
y = [2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18,20]
z = [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]
for i in range(0,10):
   print x[i], y[i], z[i]

1 2 3
2 4 4
3 6 5
4 8 6
5 10 7
7 12 8
9 14 9
11 16 10
13 18 11
15 20 12
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This works for any size of lists:

for i in zip(lst1, lst2, lst3):
    for j in i:
        print j.rjust(11),
    print

          1           3        0.52
          2           4        0.91
          4           3        0.18
          5           4        0.42
          3           3        0.21
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Nice use case for zip –  Paul Jul 10 '13 at 1:36
    
Very well. I tried to catch j.rjust(11) as a variable 'x' but printing that variable is not formatted as above. Any thoughts? –  Ibe Jul 10 '13 at 1:50
    
@Ibe, if you do x = j.rjust(11) followed by print x, is should work the same. Make sure you have the comma in the right place. –  dansalmo Jul 10 '13 at 2:53
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