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In C# how we can use SHA1 automatically?
Is SHA1 better than MD5?(We use hashing for user name and password and need speed for authentication)

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2  
I would advice SHA1 with salt. –  Guillaume Nov 18 '09 at 14:04
8  
I would advise SHA256. SHA1 is now considered to be weak. –  Mark Byers Nov 18 '09 at 14:08
1  
I would advise RIPEMD160. Heres how to use it in C# msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Cipi Aug 27 '10 at 11:28
2  
How is authentication speed a problem? Even using key strengthening (which you should!), authentication will still run in hundred of milliseconds. Also, be sure to use per-user salts, this is more important than MD5 vs SHA. –  snemarch Aug 27 '10 at 11:39
3  
Typically you want bad performance for password hashing. You typically use a scheme that slows hashing down to slow brute force attacks down. –  CodesInChaos Feb 12 '11 at 20:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Not sure what you mean by automatically, but you should really use SHA256 and higher. Also always use a Salt (code) with your hashes. A side note, after time has passed, using hardened hashes is far better than using a plain speed-based hashing function. I.e.: hashing over a few hundred iterations, or using already proven hashing functions such as bcrypt (which is mentioned below I believe). A code sample for using a SHA256 hash function in .NET is as follows:

byte[] data = new byte[DATA_SIZE];
byte[] result;

using(SHA256 shaM = new SHA256Managed()) {
    result = shaM.ComputeHash(data);
}

Will do the trick for you using SHA256 and is found at MSDN.


Sidenote on the "cracking" of SHA1: Putting the cracking of SHA-1 in perspective

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3  
-1 for the "SHA1 is cracked" part. –  quantumSoup Aug 24 '10 at 0:53
3  
@quantum - At the time there wasn't as much info on this as there is now. Removed SHA1 and added a link to "Putting the cracking of SHA1 into perspective." –  Kyle Rozendo Aug 24 '10 at 5:35
2  
The MD5 vulnerabilities do not relate to passwords. It allows the attacker to create a collision, provided that he knows the original plaintext. While this is a very bad thing for message authentication, this is not an issue for passwords. (where the original plaintext is (hopefully) unavailable to the attacker). On the other hand, see nsa.unaligned.org for SHA1 and MD5 password cracking. Notice, he does NOT use any algorithmic vulnerabilities... he just uses the fact that SHA1 and MD5 are fast. Any fast hash algorithm (SHA256 included) is vulnerable without key strengthening. –  Dragontamer5788 Aug 26 '10 at 20:23
    
I just noticed that this here is now the accepted answer. If anyone didn't realize it from my previous comment, simply using SHA256 directly like this creates a vulnerability in your password hash. It is no better than MD5 or SHA1. No one will use the MD5 vulnerabilities to crack your passwords. Brute Forcing is so fast today, that you can brute force the entire 8-character sequence in a day. You need to choose a slower algorithm than SHA256, SHA1, and MD5 to remain safe. Again, key strengthen your hash algorithm by iterating over it, or choose a slower algorithm like BCrypt or SCrypt. –  Dragontamer5788 Aug 27 '10 at 16:25
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@Kyle: I argue, we've always been talking about offline attacks. Otherwise... I fail to see where the stated MD5 and SHA1 vulnerabilities come into play with an online attack. Salts also do not matter with online attacks... Its impossible to use a rainbow table during online attacks. –  Dragontamer5788 Aug 30 '10 at 18:08

SHA1 is stronger than MD5 so if you have the choice it would be better to use it. Here's an example:

public static string CalculateSHA1(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    byte[] buffer = enc.GetBytes(text);
    SHA1CryptoServiceProvider cryptoTransformSHA1 = new SHA1CryptoServiceProvider();
    return BitConverter.ToString(cryptoTransformSHA1.ComputeHash(buffer)).Replace("-", "");
}
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8  
why do you replace "-" with ""? –  barrypicker Dec 13 '12 at 17:42
    
This always gives me the correct hash, but in upper case, which is not the right result actually... Any idea? –  andreapier Feb 11 '13 at 12:18
1  
See stackoverflow.com/a/5340599/44540 i.e. BitConverter.ToString returns a hex string, which explains both the hypen replacement and uppercase issue. –  Si. Aug 27 '13 at 6:48

From MSDN

byte[] data = new byte[DATA_SIZE];
byte[] result; 

SHA1 sha = new SHA1CryptoServiceProvider(); 
// This is one implementation of the abstract class SHA1.
result = sha.ComputeHash(data);

For comparison you can check this

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Both are too fast to be used, directly at least. Use Key Strengthening to "slow down" the password hashing procedure. Speed is the unfortunately the enemy to password security.

How slow is slow enough? Slowing down a password hash from ~microseconds to ~hundreds of milliseconds will not adversely affect the perceived performance of your application... but will make cracking passwords literally a hundred thousand times slower.

View this article for details: http://chargen.matasano.com/chargen/2007/9/7/enough-with-the-rainbow-tables-what-you-need-to-know-about-s.html

The problem is that MD5 is fast. So are its modern competitors, like SHA1 and SHA256. Speed is a design goal of a modern secure hash, because hashes are a building block of almost every cryptosystem, and usually get demand-executed on a per-packet or per-message basis.

Speed is exactly what you don’t want in a password hash function.

... snip ...

The password attack game is scored in time taken to crack password X. With rainbow tables, that time depends on how big your table needs to be and how fast you can search it. With incremental crackers, the time depends on how fast you can make the password hash function run.

That said, use BCrypt. SCrypt was recently developed, but I doubt that any stable (or production ready) libraries exist for it yet. Theoretically, SCrypt claims to improve upon BCrypt. "Building your own" is not recommended, but iterating MD5 / SHA1 / SHA256 thousands of times ought to do the trick (ie: Key Strengthening).

And in case you don't know about them, be sure to read up on Rainbow Tables. Basic security stuff.

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use SHA1 or SHA2 The MD5 algorithm is problematic.

http://userpages.umbc.edu/~mabzug1/cs/md5/md5.html http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.cryptography.md5%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

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I'd like use these things.

MD5, SHA1/256/384/512 with an optional Encoding parameter.

Othere HashAlgorithms.Thanks to Darin Dimitrov.

public static string MD5Of(string text)
{
    return MD5Of(text, Encoding.Default);
}
public static string MD5Of(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    return HashOf<MD5CryptoServiceProvider>(text, enc);
}
public static string SHA1Of(string text)
{
    return SHA1Of(text, Encoding.Default);
}
public static string SHA1Of(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    return HashOf<SHA1CryptoServiceProvider>(text, enc);
}

public static string SHA384Of(string text)
{
    return SHA384Of(text, Encoding.Default);
}
public static string SHA384Of(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    return HashOf<SHA384CryptoServiceProvider>(text, enc);
}

public static string SHA512Of(string text)
{
    return SHA512Of(text, Encoding.Default);
}
public static string SHA512Of(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    return HashOf<SHA512CryptoServiceProvider>(text, enc);
}

public static string SHA256Of(string text)
{
    return SHA256Of(text, Encoding.Default);
}
public static string SHA256Of(string text, Encoding enc)
{
    return HashOf<SHA256CryptoServiceProvider>(text, enc);
}

public static string HashOf<TP>(string text, Encoding enc)
    where TP: HashAlgorithm, new()
{
    var buffer = enc.GetBytes(text);
    var provider = new TP();
    return BitConverter.ToString(provider.ComputeHash(buffer)).Replace("-", "");
}
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