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I am writing a nested for loop to judge if two words are similar in pronunciation. My code is like below:

wordsDict = nltk.defaultdict(list)
for s1 in prondict[word1]:
    for s2 in prondict[word2]:
        sm=difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, s1, s2)
            if (sm.ratio != 1 and sm.ratio >= 0.6):
                #push word2 into the dict with key word1
                wordsDict[word1].append(word2)

The result should be a dictionary called wordsDict. For example key "university" will have a value "anniversary" since their phoneme are similar (the sm. ratio is 0.66666, which is greater than 0.6), but when the input is "university" and "good", "good" will also be append to a the key "university", but in fact the similarity of "university" and "good" is 0.0, less than 0.6. It seems my "if" control statement fails. How to make the "if" statement work?

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1  
Your if statement appears to be correct. I do wonder about the indentation - shouldn't python complain about the fact that your if is indented w.r.t. the previous line? Can you print the value of sm.ratio right before the if (and maybe add an else for debug?) – Floris Jul 10 '13 at 4:08
    
I solved it by getting the value of sm.ratio() first and then compare it to 0.6. Thank you! – noben Jul 10 '13 at 4:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is with the way you're using sm.ratio. sm.ratio is a function. To get the value that you're after, try calling it: sm.ratio()

In [77]: sm = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, "university", "anniversary")

In [78]: sm.ratio
Out[78]: <bound method SequenceMatcher.ratio of <difflib.SequenceMatcher instance at 0x104d00488>>

In [79]: sm.ratio()
Out[79]: 0.6666666666666666
share|improve this answer
    
Yes! I solved it by getting the value of sm.ratio() first and then compare it to 0.6. Thank you! – noben Jul 10 '13 at 4:15

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