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I tried older post but not able to understand following behavior.
C signed/unsigned mismatch
unsigned int and signed char comparison

#define T       long  

int main()  
{         
 unsigned T a;  
 T b;  
 a=1;  
 b=-1;      
 if(a>b)    
    printf("True\n");  
 else  
    printf("False\n");  

 return 0;  
}  

I tried above code for T=char, short int and long.
observed output for char and short is TRUE, while for int and long is FALSE. I tried above code in Ubuntu gcc.
Can anyone explain, why am I getting different output for different data types?

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7  
Duplicate hundreds of times over. What didn't you understand about the answers to the questions you linked? –  Carl Norum Jul 10 '13 at 4:59
2  
Please don't do vote this question just because it's a duplicate. This question is actually well written compared to the other floods of questions here. –  Cole Johnson Jul 10 '13 at 5:05
    
Can I refer you to this link? –  Nobilis Jul 10 '13 at 5:12

2 Answers 2

char is promoted to int in cases such as yours where you compare two variables.

Let's see what happens underneath for char types:

a is promoted to an int and it remains as 1. b is also promoted to an int, the sign is preserved and it also remains as -1. Is 1 > -1? Yes!

And what about int types:

As there as an unsigned operand involved all of them will be converted to unsigned. In the case of a which is already unsigned 1 is preserved as it is. However, b is signed and therefore we need to lose the sign.

Due to the underlying bit representation, on a 32 bit machine, -1 actually has the same bits as 4294967295. And you end up comparing if 1 is bigger than 4294967295. I think the answer is obvious.

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i tried, if((unsigned int)a>(int)b) , every time i am getting FALSE output, irrespective of data type of a and b variable. why is it behaving like this? –  Embedded Programmer Jul 15 '13 at 4:33
    
@EmbeddedProgrammer When you compare a signed and an unsigned operand, the signed one is always converted to unsigned and no amount of casting will change this. If you want to get 'True' you need to cast the unsigned operand into signed - if ((int)a > (int)b). Or for example have the following values for a and b:a=2223456789; b=-2123456789; if ((unsigned)a > (int)b). Always take into account the binary representation underneath. –  Nobilis Jul 15 '13 at 5:30
    
Nobilis, why does if(a>b) gives TRUE for char and unsigned char. As you explained it is converted to int, but when i convert a and b into hex value the a=1 and b=-2147483648.it is ok,but when i try for int or long. then a=1 and b=-2147483648. then why am i getting FALSE? it should be TRUE. –  Embedded Programmer Jul 15 '13 at 6:11
    
@EmbeddedProgrammer Can you please post your assignments as code, I'm not sure what you mean. Are you assigning -2147483648 to a char? –  Nobilis Jul 15 '13 at 6:18
    
Hi Nobilis, i have given above code for #define T long in first question. –  Embedded Programmer Jul 15 '13 at 9:04

When testing against the signed b value for char and short the value gets widen to an int and this replicates the sign bit whereas for the a value the signed bit is not replicated.

Thus for char the if becomes if (0x00000001 > 0xFFFFFFFF) and this is true (assuming a 32 bit int).

But when using an unsigned that is an int or bigger the test is done using an unsigned comparision.

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i tried, if((unsigned int)a>(int)b) , every time i am getting FALSE output, irrespective of data type of a and b variable. why is it behaving like this? –  Embedded Programmer Jul 15 '13 at 4:31

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