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The following code returns an error, but I am not sure why. What needs to be changed to allow for compilation?

switch (DAO.class) {
    case BookDAO.class: 
        return bookDAO;
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Raedwald, RAS, Sean Owen, RaYell, Stecya Jul 11 '13 at 7:56

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What error does it give? – Raedwald Jul 11 '13 at 7:08
up vote 16 down vote accepted

A switch works with the byte, short, char, and int primitive data types. It also works with enumerated types (and String from Java 7 onwards). NOT Class types.

DAO.class returns Class object of DAO

Refer this for what .class means

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1  
@RiaD: I thought link will cover remaining things. – Nambari Jul 10 '13 at 5:09
1  
good one @Nambari !! – user2416728 Jul 10 '13 at 5:26
    
so then i have to use ifs ..great – osh Jul 10 '13 at 6:17

From Java Docs

A switch works with the byte, short, char, and int primitive data types. It also works with enumerated types (discussed in Enum Types), the String class, and a few special classes that wrap certain primitive types: Character, Byte, Short, and Integer

More On this

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If you are using Java 7 - you can use switch statements with Strings. Then you could do something like this:

switch (DAO.class.getName()){
    case BookDAO.class.getName() : return bookDAO;
}

getName():

Returns the name of the entity (class, interface, array class, primitive type, or void) represented by this Class object, as a String.

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Here is the definition of the switch statement:

Unlike if-then and if-then-else statements, the switch statement can have a number of possible execution paths. A switch works with the byte, short, char, and int primitive data types. It also works with enumerated types (discussed in Enum Types), the String class, and a few special classes that wrap certain primitive types: Character, Byte, Short, and Integer (discussed in Numbers and Strings).


So it is not allowed Class type in the switch statement (Class classOfA = A.class;)

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