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I'm trying to learn WebGL and JavaScript at the moment as I want to use my graphical programming skills to create 3D web applications. I'm used to OpenGL programming in C++.

Now, doing some tutorials I come across of variables which are neither declared anywhere nor included from some other scripts as far as I can see. Here are two examples:

The khronos wiki tutorial is constantly using a variable g, for example:

g.program = simpleSetup( /* ... */ );

g was never declared in this scope. How to find out what it stands for? Google does not yield much searching for 'g' or 'javascript g' of course.

Another example is the voxolent beginners guide which is using mat4, starting with something like:

mat4.identity(mvMatrix);

Due to knowing OpenGL I understand this line of code: getting identity matrix from modelview, but where does the mat4 come from? Using this line of code in my own project breaks my script. Google yields for 'mat4' this documentation but it also says simply use:

mat4.create();

... which is obviously not working without further steps.

What is it I'm missing here? Do I always have to guess/digg around when I see unknown variables in examples/tutorials/documentations? How to include mat4 in my script? What is g?

Please, explain this for me.

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I'm guessing that g is probably defined in one of the helper libraries which are specified at the top of that tutorial. The links seem to be non-functioning though. –  Hath995 Jul 10 '13 at 6:02
    
If you look at the actual source code for the examples, it'll probably be obvious, but mat4 is coming from an external matrix-math library and g is the variable used to store a reference to the WebGL 3D context. –  HartleySan Jul 10 '13 at 6:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Regarding your question about the variable "g", it's just a globally accessible variable that contains a lot of other useful variables.

At the global scope, you declare var g = {}; and then later, you can add members to g by doing g.myGlProgram = simpleSetup(...) or g.myVertexBuffer = ctx.createBuffer(...)

It's just a nice JavaScript trick

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I found mat4 comes from js/math/gl-matrix-min.js

Here's how I did it using Google Chrome:

  1. Load page http://voxelent.com/html/beginners-guide/1727_04/ch4_ModelView_Rotation.html
  2. Press F12
  3. Switch to Console tab and type mat4, the result looks like it's not a built in object for I could see the compact source code
  4. Switch to Sources tab and switch to Source tab, see the tree
  5. Just expanded js folder and saw math folder and expand
  6. Saw a lot of mat4.set mat4.transpose ...

Oh, and the first line suggest the source code comes from https://github.com/toji/gl-matrix/

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