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I have created a new ArrayList using subList Method.Now when I try to perform intersection operation using retainAll it Throws following exception

retainAll() Method works for Below Code

List<Integer> arrNums1 = new ArrayList<Integer>();
arrNums1.add(1);
arrNums1.add(2);
arrNums1.add(3);

List<Integer> arrNums2 = arrNums1.subList(0, 1);
arrNums2.retainAll(arrNums1);

But when i try to apply retainAll for Below code it generates Exception as Below

Java Code

public class Generics1
{   
 public static void main(String[] args)
 {
       List<Fruits> arrFruits = new ArrayList<Fruits>();

        Fruits objApple  = new Apple();
        Fruits objOrange = new Orange();
        Fruits objMango  = new Mango();

        arrFruits.add(objApple);
        arrFruits.add(objOrange);
        arrFruits.add(objMango);

        List<Fruits> arrNewFruits = arrFruits.subList(0, 1);

        System.out.println(arrFruits.retainAll(arrNewFruits));
  }
}

class Fruits {}

class Apple extends Fruits {}

class Orange extends Fruits {}

class Mango extends Fruits {}

ERROR

enter image description here

share|improve this question
2  
Where possible a code example with no unknown dependacies is best. For example does this only occur with the Fruit class or would a standard java class have the same problem? – Richard Tingle Jul 10 '13 at 7:13
    
When the List contains a Numbers say when I create a List<Integer> retainAll works gr8 – Java Beginner Jul 10 '13 at 7:14
    
Yes I used String and tested it also worked – Sanjaya Liyanage Jul 10 '13 at 7:15
    
I've tested with Vector3d and also experience no problem (although I was expecting to). If using Fruit is indeed essential to replicating the problem then its code should be included in the question – Richard Tingle Jul 10 '13 at 7:19
    
The quoted code is an improvement but it would be good if it could be a complete program (with a main method) – Richard Tingle Jul 10 '13 at 7:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your two code examples you have the big list and the sub-list in reverse order.

When you invoke retainAll() on the sub-list, no modifications will occur.

This is because each element in the sub-list is in the big list.

If no modification occurs, no ConcurrentModificationException will be thrown.

You do this above with your list of Integers.


If you reverse the order and invoke retainAll() on the big list, it will get mutated.

This is because not every item in the big list is in the sub-list.

When you remove an element from the big list, a ConcurrentModificationException is thrown.

This is because you cannot mutate a list while iterating over it.

You do this above with your list of Fruits.


The iteration takes place in the retainAll() method.

In your code, the list argument happens to reference the same list that's being modified.

This is because of the way List.subList() works:

Returns a view of the portion of this list between the specified fromIndex, inclusive, and toIndex, exclusive. (If fromIndex and toIndex are equal, the returned list is empty.) The returned list is backed by this list, so non-structural changes in the returned list are reflected in this list, and vice-versa.


Long story short:

You won't get an Exception If you change your code to this:

System.out.println(arrNewFruits.retainAll(arrFruits));

More importantly:

You need to create a new list from the sub-list if there's a chance that either list will get modified while one of the lists is being iterated over.

You can create a new list from the sub-list like this:

List<Foo> freshList = new ArrayList<Foo>(bigList.subList(0,2));

Now you can iterate and mutate to your heart's content!


Here's an implementation of ArrayList.retainAll(), where you can look for the iteration.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I wanted to say the same thing , but didn't have the patience to write it . – NINCOMPOOP Jul 10 '13 at 8:34
    
Even the code in contains() , checking against the size can be a probable reason : for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) . – NINCOMPOOP Jul 10 '13 at 8:36
    
It is probably the same case when you try to remove elements from the List using List#remove() while iterating . In some edge cases it works. – NINCOMPOOP Jul 10 '13 at 8:37
    
@TheNewIdiot - I think you hit it before. You modify the backing list by removing an element. This classifies as a structural modification to the backing list that that occurs "in such a fashion that iterations in progress may yield incorrect results." – jahroy Jul 10 '13 at 8:42

When you use List#subList():

Returns a view of the portion of this list between the specified fromIndex, inclusive, and toIndex, exclusive. (If fromIndex and toIndex are equal, the returned list is empty.) The returned list is backed by this list, so non-structural changes in the returned list are reflected in this list, and vice-versa. The returned list supports all of the optional list operations supported by this list.

You are allowed to mutate elements within it but not change the structure of the list.

The doc further says :

The semantics of the list returned by this method become undefined if the backing list (i.e., this list) is structurally modified in any way other than via the returned list. (Structural modifications are those that change the size of this list, or otherwise perturb it in such a fashion that iterations in progress may yield incorrect results.)

The retainAll() function uses an iterator to delete the non intersecting values , this causes ConcurrentModificationException. Note what the documenation says :

Note that this exception does not always indicate that an object has been concurrently modified by a different thread. If a single thread issues a sequence of method invocations that violates the contract of an object, the object may throw this exception.

Make a copy of the List and then perform retainAll():

List<Fruits> arrNewFruits = new ArrayList<>(arrFruits.subList(0, 1));
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote up a big answer about how mutation during iteration was the cause of the Exception... Then I added a link to an OpenJdk implementation of retainAll(). Looking at the code, the iteration isn't as obvious as I thought it would be. Is the for loop enough to throw the Exception, or is it caused by something else (maybe the call to System.arrayCopy())? – jahroy Jul 10 '13 at 8:31
    
I saw the code it seems System.arrayCopy() is the culprit . – NINCOMPOOP Jul 10 '13 at 8:33

The problem is that arrNewFruits is actually just a logical view of a part of arrFruits.1 To avoid the error, you need to make an independent list:

List<Fruits> arrNewFruits = new ArrayList<>(arrFruits.subList(0, 1));

1 That is why you can remove part of a list by calling clear() on a subList()—changes to one are seen in the other.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am convinced with your answer but why it works when i Create ArrayList of Integer – Java Beginner Jul 10 '13 at 7:20
1  
@JavaBeginner - It will not work using Integers if you invoke retainAll() on the big list (in stead of the sub-list). Look at your code, the two examples are not the same at all! You invoke retainAll() on the small list of Integers, yet you invoke retainAll() on the big list of Fruits. – jahroy Jul 10 '13 at 7:49

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