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I saw a piece of code regarding Knockout and went through it but I could not understand how this code works. Here is the complete code for binding a normal method with a Knockout viewmodel.

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>
    <script src="Scripts/knockout-2.2.1.js"></script>
    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.7.1.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        <input type="button" data-bind="click: callalert" name="knockoutbtn" value="Call Knockout Method"/>
        <input type="button" name="normalbtn" id="nbtn" value="Call Normal Method"/>

        <script type="text/javascript">
            var callmethod = function () {   //Normal Method which would be 
                alert('hello');              //called from knockout binding   
            }                                //also from the normal button click  
            $(document).ready(function () {           //Binded the Method with normal button 
                $("#nbtn").live("click", callmethod);
            });

            ko.applyBindings({                        //Binded the method with ko view model
                callalert : callmethod
            });

        </script>
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>  

I just do not understand what the meaning of this code is: data-bind="click: callalert" and also do not understand this code:

ko.applyBindings({                        //Binded the method with ko view model
                callalert : callmethod
            });

It seems that when the user clicks on the first button then a method will be called named callalert but in the code there is no method named callalert. When the user clicks on the second button, then a method will be called named callmethod.

So please help me to understand the above code. Especially these two points

1) data-bind="click: callalert"
2) ko.applyBindings({                        //Binded the method with ko view model
                    callalert : callmethod
                });

UPDATE

suppose if anyone just see it below

var person = {
    firstName: 'John',
    lastName: 'Doe',
    sayHi: sayHiFunction,
    pets: ['Cat', 'Dog']
};

then how anyone would understand that sayHiFunction is a function because there is no bracket like sayHiFunction() ?

if you look the above code then u can see

$(document).ready(function () {           //Binded the Method with normal button 
      $("#nbtn").live("click", callmethod);
});

that callmethod is calling by jquery code. so why twice it is define in code that callmethod need to be called when user click on button. once it is done by jquery and once it is done by knockout binding ? can u explain in detail.

if i remove the jquery portion then callmethod will be called when user click on button. waiting for your answer. thanks

share|improve this question
    
Have you read any of the kncokout documentation starting from: knockoutjs.com/documentation/click-binding.html? –  nemesv Jul 10 '13 at 8:24
    
To answer your bit about two ways of doing the same thing: It is just an example of what can be done. –  Tim B James Jul 10 '13 at 10:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Javascript objects

{ callalert : callmethod }

is a regular javascript object with one property: callalert. In JS, you can construct objects in a key-value-pair fashion:

var person = {
    firstName: 'John',
    lastName: 'Doe',
    sayHi: function() {
        alert('Hi!');
    },
    pets: ['Cat', 'Dog']
};

This constructs an object that we put in a variable person and give four properties: two normal properties (of string type), one function and on array.

Because in JS, functions are also objects, you can put them in variables and use them as such. So you can define a function and put it in a variable (as you are doing with your callmethod variable) and then assign it to a member of an object (as you are doing with the callalert property).

This would also work in my example:

var sayHiFunction = function() {
    alert('Hi!');
};

var person = {
    firstName: 'John',
    lastName: 'Doe',
    sayHi: sayHiFunction,
    pets: ['Cat', 'Dog']
};

Knockout applyBindings

Next,

ko.applyBindings

accepts a javascript object. Usually, you would use an object with observable properties (properties handled by Knockout), but you can also have functions in it.

In your case, you only have a function. The implementation of the function is callmethod and the identifier to call is callalert.

So if you would do:

var myVariable = { callalert : callmethod };
myVariable.callalert();

you would get the alert. You've effectively created an object with one member (callalert) which is a function (with the implementation of callmethod), and put it in myVariable.

Knockout data-bind

Now, what data-bind="click: callalert" does is let Knockout know it should databind the click event to the callalert property of your viewmodel (the object you passed to applyBindings). So when you click on the button, Knockout will call the callalert method on the viewmodel.

Update - jQuery

The jQuery code is indeed more readable. But when you have complex UIs, it will often require a lot of jQuery code (for hiding, showing, updating, etc controls). This can easily become hard to maintain and read. For this, Knockout and its MVVM approach can help.

The reason the code has it twice, is for showing the difference I believe. The first button used Knockout to call the method, the second button uses jQuery.

Both are valid approaches. In fact, I'd recommend jQuery if it's just that simple. But if you have more complex UIs, or if your project uses it in other screens, you might want to go with Knockout.

As for

how anyone would understand that sayHiFunction is a function because there is no bracket like sayHiFunction() ?

You can't immediately, but you know it's a variable, so if you look for the variable, you'll find out. But unless you need to set the implementation of the function dynamically at runtime, you'd have no reason to write it like this. You'd write the function inline:

var person = {
    sayHi: function() {
        alert('Hi');
    }
}

But even then, you can still change it:

person.sayHi = function() {
    alert('Hello!');
}

This makes JS a powerful language, but indeed not always easy to read for beginners.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry i do not understand this code var myVariable = { callalert : callmethod }; myVariable.callalert(); what is the meaning of callalert : callmethod ? what is callalert & what is callmethod ? looking for discussion with more example. thanks –  Thomas Jul 10 '13 at 9:01
    
I edited my answer explaining how you can construct JS objects. Let me know if it's clear/unclear. –  Peter Jul 10 '13 at 9:11
    
thanks for better explanation. now it is clear but i have update my question. please have a look. –  Thomas Jul 10 '13 at 10:16
    
Update my answer too. Hope it is clear, let me know if not. –  Peter Jul 10 '13 at 10:26
    
if i like to have more property the person should have then later approach may not work.i am talking about this person.sayHi = function() { alert('Hello!'); } am i right ? –  Thomas Jul 10 '13 at 10:41

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