Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like cell indices of a contiguous (box-shaped) area area in a 3d grid, i.e. a 3d set {iMin…iMax}×{jMin…jMax}×{kMin…kMax}. The naive approach would be:

for(int i=iMin; i<=iMax; i++){
  for(int j=jMin; j<=jMax; j++){
    for(int k=kMin; k<=kMax; k++){
      // ...
    }
  }
}

Is there a less verbose way to do that, without nested loops?

(I am in c++11 and have a Vector3i class for coordinates. I can use any boost library, also.)

share|improve this question
    
As contiguity cannot not be guaranteed in full generality; I doubt it. The three loops will probably be faster (and certainly clearer) than one iterating variable and an elaborate mapping algorithm from that to the coordinates. –  Bathsheba Jul 10 '13 at 8:30
    
If you have control over the Vector3i class, you could overload operator[] if you wanted. However, what's the problem with nested loops? That way, it's very clear to every reader of your code what you're doing. –  arne Jul 10 '13 at 8:55
    
Vector3i is from Eigen; it already defines operator[]. Nested loops take three lines and it is easy to mistype something. –  eudoxos Jul 10 '13 at 9:05
    
@Bathsheba: the range IS contiguous, I am pretty sure about that. –  eudoxos Jul 10 '13 at 12:04
add comment

2 Answers 2

One way would be wrapping you 3 fors into algorithm for_each_3d and pass it a lambda, but it will only work for 3d and accessing neighboring elements would be a pain. Or you can use boost_mutli array and loop similar to this: how to traverse a boost::multi_array Note, that multi_array is an array and cannot be resized after construction

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want a single loop you can go for something like this:

int main()
{
  size_t const N=8, M=N*N*N;
  size_t x(0), y(0), z(0);
  for (size_t i=0; i<M; ++i)
  {
    std::cout << x << ", " << y << ", " << z << std::endl;
    ++z;
    if (z == N)
    {
      z=0;
      ++y;
      if (y == N)
      {
        y=0;
        ++x;
      }
    }
  }
}

But don't say I told you it looks nice! ;)

share|improve this answer
    
WOW, that's really ugly ;) –  eudoxos Jul 10 '13 at 12:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.