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I am using a hash of hashes in Ruby, called MYMOVIES, as below.

    {"127 Hours"=>
       {"title"=>"127 Hours",
       "year"=>"2010",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1300489200,
       "seen_date"=>"19/3/2011",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1542344",
       "rating"=>"6",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=127 Hours&y=2010"},
    "Zombieland"=>
       {"title"=>"Zombieland",
       "year"=>"2009",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1290207600,
       "seen_date"=>"20/11/2010",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1156398",
       "rating"=>"7",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=Zombieland&y=2009"}}

Now, I would like to get all the keys of the first nested hash (i.e. title, year, plays, ..., omdbapiurl).

I tried with:

   mynestedhash = MYMOVIES.first
   puts mynestedhash.keys.to_s

But I get the error:

    undefined method `keys' for #<Array:0x801c56f8> (NoMethodError)

How could I do?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If all inner hashes have the same keys, the following will suffice

first_outer_key, first_outer_value = MYMOVIES.first 
first_inner_hash = first_outer_value # change name to show what we have
inner_keys = first_inner_hash.keys

If the keys of the inner hashes can be different, you should join them like Priti and toro2k did in their solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks a lot! –  MDT Jul 10 '13 at 9:39

This should do:

MYMOVIES.map { |_, h| h.keys }.flatten.uniq
# => ["title", "year", "plays", "last_played", "seen_date", "imdb_id", "rating", "omdbapiurl"] 

Your code didn't work because the method first returns an array, not a hash:

MYMOVIES.first
# => ["127 Hours", {"title"=>"127 Hours", ... }]]

Update If you want to get the keys of the first hash, then you could do:

nested_hash = MYMOVIES.first[1]
nested_hash.keys
# => ["title", "year", "plays", "last_played", "seen_date", "imdb_id", "rating", "omdbapiurl"] 

Or alternatively:

_, nested_hash = MYMOVIES.first
nested_hash.keys
# => ["title", "year", "plays", "last_played", "seen_date", "imdb_id", "rating", "omdbapiurl"] 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but isn't there any way to return an hash from the hash (since I created it as hash of hash!)? mytmplist = {} mytmplist['title'] = "" mytmplist['year'] = "" mytmplist['plays'] = 1 mytmplist['last_played'] = mytimestamp mytmplist['seen_date'] = myformattedseendate mytmplist['imdb_id'] = "" mytmplist['rating'] = "" mytmplist['omdbapiurl'] = "" MYMOVIES[movietitle] = "" –  MDT Jul 10 '13 at 8:46
2  
@MDT What you asked in this post has been answered. Now if you have other need post it in another question. From comment it is not readable what you are looking for. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 10 '13 at 8:51
    
mytmplist = {} mytmplist['title'] = "" mytmplist['year'] = "" mytmplist['plays'] = 1 mytmplist['last_played'] = mytimestamp mytmplist['seen_date'] = myformattedseendate mytmplist['imdb_id'] = "" mytmplist['rating'] = "" mytmplist['omdbapiurl'] = "" MYMOVIES[movietitle] = mytmplist That's what I wanted to post, sorry about the not-readable post before and thanks a lot for your useful answer. –  MDT Jul 10 '13 at 8:56
    
Thank you very much, I got it! :) –  MDT Jul 10 '13 at 9:39
require 'pp'
h = {"127 Hours"=>
       {"title"=>"127 Hours",
       "year"=>"2010",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1300489200,
       "seen_date"=>"19/3/2011",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1542344",
       "rating"=>"6",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=127 Hours&y=2010"},
    "Zombieland"=>
       {"title"=>"Zombieland",
       "year"=>"2009",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1290207600,
       "seen_date"=>"20/11/2010",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1156398",
       "rating"=>"7",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=Zombieland&y=2009"}}

pp h.flat_map{|k,v| v.keys}.uniq

Output

["title",
 "year",
 "plays",
 "last_played",
 "seen_date",
 "imdb_id",
 "rating",
 "omdbapiurl"]

Now see why your code didn't work below :

h = {"127 Hours"=>
       {"title"=>"127 Hours",
       "year"=>"2010",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1300489200,
       "seen_date"=>"19/3/2011",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1542344",
       "rating"=>"6",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=127 Hours&y=2010"},
    "Zombieland"=>
       {"title"=>"Zombieland",
       "year"=>"2009",
       "plays"=>1,
       "last_played"=>1290207600,
       "seen_date"=>"20/11/2010",
       "imdb_id"=>"tt1156398",
       "rating"=>"7",
       "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=Zombieland&y=2009"}}

h.first
#["127 Hours",
# {"title"=>"127 Hours",
# "year"=>"2010",
# "plays"=>1,
# "last_played"=>1300489200,
# "seen_date"=>"19/3/2011",
# "imdb_id"=>"tt1542344",
# "rating"=>"6",
# "omdbapiurl"=>"http://www.omdbapi.com/?t=127 Hours&y=2010"}]
p h.first.grep /keys/
#[]

Now it is clear that from #grep method that Array don't have keys method. So try the above code to make it workable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your useful explanation! –  MDT Jul 10 '13 at 9:38

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