Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

Whenever we try to serialize an object of a Class, we always have a unique value for serialVersionId as a private final field, what is its significance with respect to deserialization, can we use it to check whether the object and the values have been deserialized in a proper way ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by StinePike, Lion, Bohemian, Uwe Plonus, Graviton Jul 22 '13 at 3:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Oh..sorry..thanks for the refrence.. – Ullas Jul 10 '13 at 8:44
    
See also How is serialVersionUID serialized in Java? – Lion Jul 10 '13 at 8:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is used to check whether the same class definition was used for Serialization as well as DeSerialization. Straight from the documentation

The serialization runtime associates with each serializable class a version number, called a serialVersionUID, which is used during deserialization to verify that the sender and receiver of a serialized object have loaded classes for that object that are compatible with respect to serialization. If the receiver has loaded a class for the object that has a different serialVersionUID than that of the corresponding sender's class, then deserialization will result in an InvalidClassException. A serializable class can declare its own serialVersionUID explicitly by declaring a field named "serialVersionUID" that must be static, final, and of type long:

ANY-ACCESS-MODIFIER static final long serialVersionUID = 42L;

If a serializable class does not explicitly declare a serialVersionUID, then the serialization runtime will calculate a default serialVersionUID value for that class based on various aspects of the class, as described in the Java(TM) Object Serialization Specification. However, it is strongly recommended that all serializable classes explicitly declare serialVersionUID values, since the default serialVersionUID computation is highly sensitive to class details that may vary depending on compiler implementations, and can thus result in unexpected InvalidClassExceptions during deserialization. Therefore, to guarantee a consistent serialVersionUID value across different java compiler implementations, a serializable class must declare an explicit serialVersionUID value. It is also strongly advised that explicit serialVersionUID declarations use the private modifier where possible, since such declarations apply only to the immediately declaring class--serialVersionUID fields are not useful as inherited members.

Also , check Josh Bloch's book Effective Java (2nd Edition):

the automatically-generated UID is generated based on a class name, implemented interfaces, and all public and protected members. Changing any of these in any way will change the serialVersionUID. So you don't need to mess with them only if you are certain that no more than one version of the class will ever be serialized (either across processes or retrieved from storage at a later time).

If you ignore them for now, and find later that you need to change the class in some way but maintain compatibility w/ old version of the class, you can use the JDK tool serialver to generate the serialVersionUID on the old class, and explicitly set that on the new class. (Depending on your changes you may need to also implement custom serialization by adding writeObject and readObject methods - see Serializable javadoc or aforementioned chapter 11.)

share|improve this answer
    
upvote, it was informative :) – Prasad Kharkar Jul 10 '13 at 8:41
    
This is almost same as answer of Jon Skeet : stackoverflow.com/questions/285793/… – Manish Doshi Jul 10 '13 at 8:44
    
If we are creating a Custom Class and implementing Serializable , if we give our own id. how will the receiver come to know about this class based on id in some other machine? – Ullas Jul 10 '13 at 8:50
    
serialVersionUID gets serialized along with the object. Moreover the class definition should be present in the remote machine for de serialization. – NINCOMPOOP Jul 10 '13 at 8:54
    
Ok.Got it..Thanks.. – Ullas Jul 10 '13 at 9:10

From the doc of Serializable Object

The serialization runtime associates with each serializable class a version number, called a serialVersionUID, which is used during deserialization to verify that the sender and receiver of a serialized object have loaded classes for that object that are compatible with respect to serialization. If the receiver has loaded a class for the object that has a different serialVersionUID than that of the corresponding sender's class, then deserialization will result in an InvalidClassException. A serializable class can declare its own serialVersionUID explicitly by declaring a field named "serialVersionUID" that must be static, final, and of type long:

ANY-ACCESS-MODIFIER static final long serialVersionUID = 42L;

If a serializable class does not explicitly declare a serialVersionUID, then the serialization runtime will calculate a default serialVersionUID value for that class based on various aspects of the class, as described in the Java(TM) Object Serialization Specification. However, it is strongly recommended that all serializable classes explicitly declare serialVersionUID values, since the default serialVersionUID computation is highly sensitive to class details that may vary depending on compiler implementations, and can thus result in unexpected InvalidClassExceptions during deserialization. Therefore, to guarantee a consistent serialVersionUID value across different java compiler implementations, a serializable class must declare an explicit serialVersionUID value. It is also strongly advised that explicit serialVersionUID declarations use the private modifier where possible, since such declarations apply only to the immediately declaring class--serialVersionUID fields are not useful as inherited members. Array classes cannot declare an explicit serialVersionUID, so they always have the default computed value, but the requirement for matching serialVersionUID values is waived for array classes.

There is a similar Thread. Check this here

share|improve this answer
    
This is same as answer of Jon Skeet : stackoverflow.com/questions/285793/… – Manish Doshi Jul 10 '13 at 8:45
2  
@ManishDoshi yup later found it and marked the question as duplicated. Anyways it is same as the doc not the same of that thread :p – StinePike Jul 10 '13 at 8:51

It is important when you serialize and de-serialize the same class using different VMs or on different machines. The UID is used to check, if the class you are trying to de-serialize is the really the one you think it is, so if your class in your code has one UID, and the class that was serialized has a different one, the de-serialization will fail.

A class without a UID will be given one automatically by the JVM, but there is no guarantee that different JVMs will give the same UID to the same class.

You can also refer this, which I found from SO:

What is a serialVersionUID and why should I use it? http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/Serializable.html

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.