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I created a simple random phrase generator, which adds the phrase to an empty div each time a user clicks a "generate" button. Each click results in the the phrase being regenerated. That part works like a charm.

I wanted to display the last 5 phrases that each specific person generated (not what the last 5 users to the site generated). That is, display the results of the last five phrases generated each time that user clicked the "generate" button.

I figured (perhaps incorrectly) that the simplest way to do this was to create a cookie for each phrase generated and then just display the content of each of those cookies.

So, I found a jquery.cookie plugin, which I managed to get working and create a cookie when someone clicks the button using this:

$(document).ready(function(){
$("#button").click(function () {
$.cookie('cookie_1', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
})
});

The problem is that I want to store the last five phrases. Using the above, each click overwrites the cookie. So, I thought something like this would work:

if($.cookie('cookie_1') == null) {
$(document).ready(function(){
$("#button").click(function () {
$.cookie('cookie_1', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
})
});
}
else{
$("#button").click(function () {
$.cookie('cookie_2', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
})
};

But here's what's happening. I click the button, cookie_1 is set with the text in the div "#phrase_here". If I click the button again, cookie_1 gets changed to the new phrase in the "#phrase_here" div. I thought my statement above would do a check to see if cookie_1 exists and if so, then create a new, different cookie (cookie_2). If I click the button and reload the page, cookie_1 is still set. But then if I click the button, it sets cookie_2 and not cookie_1. Not sure why the page reload is necessary to cause this behavior (which is what I want).

Ultimately, I want to store 5 cookies using the same logic that if there isn't a cookie then create one. After there are 5, then overwrite cookie_1. Not sure what do after that though, as I don't think I can write something that would then overwrite cookie_2.

Clearly, there is a better way to do this. Trying to avoid using a database and do it all in the browser. I know this limits what's possible and won't work for everyone, but that's okay. Just an experiment for now.

I'm open to using JavaScript, jQuery, or if necessary, PHP. I'm just not sure how best to do it. Hope the question makes sense.

UPDATE: This code works well to create the five cookies without overwriting. The trick now is how to overwrite the first cookie once five have been created and then overwrite the second and so on.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need the last 5 values to persist beyond the browser session? –  Jon Jul 10 '13 at 12:05
    
I'd call that optional, but not necessary. –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 12:08
    
Recent research seems that LocalStorage could possibly be a better way to go than cookies. I haven't implemented it myself yet but looking here it has great browser support: caniuse.com/localstorage and you can store arrays easily which meets your requirement. –  rtpHarry Jul 10 '13 at 12:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have completely replaced my original answer with the code below.

It auto loops the back round after the 5 and tracks which one it was last on.

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#button").click(function () {
        setPhraseCookie();
    });
});

function setPhraseCookie() {
    var cookieIndex = getNextPhraseCookieIndex();
    var cookieName = 'cookie_'.concat(cookieIndex);
    $.cookie(cookieName, $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
    $.cookie("next_cookie_index", ++cookieIndex, { expires: 7 });
}

function getNextPhraseCookieIndex() {
    // first check cookie index exists
    var cookieIndex = $.cookie('next_cookie_index');
    if (cookieIndex != null) {
        return cookieIndex % 5; // set to number of phrase slots in use
    }

    // then check for first empty slot
    for(var i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
        if($.cookie('cookie_'.concat(i)) == null) {  
            return i;
        }
    }

    // then fall back on first slot
    return 1;
}

Note: If it can't figure out which one to fill and all 5 slots are full it defaults to using slot 1. I was just about to post this and saw your comment on my reply - it doesn't currently check the dates of the existing cookies to see which is the oldest, it just uses slot 1.

I can see a potential problem with this code. In theory there should always be a next_cookie_index cookie tracking the next one but I think perhaps on day 7 there might be some issues where cookies have expired but other cookies still exist. Eg if they added the phrase 4 several days after the first three, the first three will expire after 7 days then when a new one is added you would have slot 1, 4, 5 filled because it would put it in the first free slot. Does this concern you or is this enough for its purpose?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. Any thoughts on how to handle the issue when there are five cookies to then overwrite the first and then the second, and so on? That is, once there are five, overwrite the oldest cookie. –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 13:00
1  
Thanks a lot for the update. Just tried it out and it works perfect. Clever way to solve the problem.The issue you pointed out makes total sense and it won't be an issue for this purpose (very good catch though). –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 15:56
    
Sorry...just thought of one more thing. I'm displaying the last five phrases generated by adding the text of the cookie into a div with jQuery. How would you go about displaying them in order with newest at top and oldest at bottom? This might be another question entirely. –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 16:03
    
yes my first thoughts about this are that my code will need almost entirely rewriting. let me think about it. –  rtpHarry Jul 10 '13 at 16:27

Your Code seems little strange to me... And if you try it like this:

   $(document).ready(function() {

    $("#button").click(function() {
        if ($.cookie('cookie_1') == null) {
            $.cookie('cookie_1', $('#phrase_here').text(), {expires: 7});
        }
        else {
            $.cookie('cookie_2', $('#phrase_here').text(), {expires: 7});
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Below code may help you,

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#button").click(function () {
        if($.cookie('cookie_1') == null) {//if cookie 1 is not set  
            $.cookie('cookie_1', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
        }
        else if($.cookie('cookie_2') == null){//if cookie 2 is not set
            $.cookie('cookie_2', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
        }
        else if($.cookie('cookie_3') == null){//if cookie 3 is not set
            $.cookie('cookie_3', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
        }
        else if($.cookie('cookie_4') == null){//if cookie 4 is not set
            $.cookie('cookie_4', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
        }
        else if($.cookie('cookie_5') == null){//if cookie 5 is not set
            $.cookie('cookie_5', $('#phrase_here').text(), { expires: 7 });
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
This is better code but doesn't meet the OP's requirement to cycle back to overwrite cookie_1 if all exist. –  rtpHarry Jul 10 '13 at 12:12
    
This worked perfectly. However, when there are all five cookies set, I'd like the script to overwrite the first cookie. That seems easy enough. The trick is what after that? How would the script know that cookie_1 was just rewritten because there were already 5 cookies, so it should rewrite cookie_2 (and so on)? –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 12:16

Since you don't need to persist the last 5 phrases beyond the browser session (per your comment), could you just store the values in memory?

$(document).ready(function () {

    var game = (function () {

        var phrases = [];

        return {

            store: function (phrase) {
                phrases.push(phrase);
                game.refresh();
            },

            refresh: function () {
                // clear your container displaying the last 5 phrases
                // loop over phrases 0-5 and display in your container
            }
        };

    }());

    $('#button').click(function (e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        var phrase = $('#phrase_here').text();
        game.store(phrase);
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure where in here this is pulling the phrase that was generated (text in div "phrase here") and saving that and then saving the new phrase when the button is clicked to generate another phrase. –  jonmrich Jul 10 '13 at 12:20
    
It's psuedo-code. In the jQuery click function, that's where you would find your phrase, e.g. var phrase = $('#yourDivOrWherever').text(); The value found is ultimately stored in the 'phrases' variable inside that closure. Unlike cookies, this closure prevents others from changing the recent phrases generated. If you wanted to keep those values beyond the browser session, you could swap out the logic in "store" to use cookies or local storage. –  Jon Jul 10 '13 at 12:23

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