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I want to successively multiply adjacent element of the list and add the multiplication:

  • ([1,2,3,4]) should perform (1*2+2*3+3*4), and
  • [1,2,3] I want to get 8 because (1*2)+(2*3)
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1  
Something is not clear in what you are asking, either your examples are wrong - or you are not multiplying. 1 times 2 times 3 is 6, not 8. –  Inbar Rose Jul 10 '13 at 12:03
    
Essentially the same as stackoverflow.com/q/14916957/1907098, except you sum the resulting list. –  Volatility Jul 10 '13 at 12:13
    
Sounds like you need to fold or zip ... –  Shark Jul 10 '13 at 12:23
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6 Answers

Using list comprehension:

>>> mylist = [1,2,3,4]
>>> sum(mylist[i] * mylist[i + 1] for i in range(len(mylist) - 1))
20
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Using the pairwise itertools recipe:

>>> sum(a * b for (a, b) in pairwise([1, 2, 3, 4]))
20
>>> sum(a * b for (a, b) in pairwise([1, 2, 3]))
8

What I need to change if want function([1,2,3,4]) perform (1*2*3*4)?

>>> from functools import reduce
>>> from operator import mul
>>> reduce(mul, [1, 2, 3, 4])
24
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What I need to chenge if want function([1,2,3,4]) perform (1*2*3*4)? –  user2469891 Jul 10 '13 at 12:48
    
@user2469891 See my edit. –  poke Jul 10 '13 at 12:55
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Try this:

x=[1,2,3,4]
print sum(a*b for a,b in zip(x, x[1:]))
#prints 20
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4  
+1. You can shed the [:-1], print sum(a*b for a,b in zip(x, x[1:])) produces the same result –  1_CR Jul 10 '13 at 12:12
    
Updated. Thanks. –  rr- Jul 10 '13 at 13:12
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Function using sum, map, lambda and zip

def my_math(lst):
    return sum(map(lambda x: x[0]*x[1], zip(lst,  lst[1:])))

>>> my_math([1,2,3])
8
>>> my_math([1,2,3,4])
20
>>> my_math([1,2,3,4,5])
40
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That's what I thought "multiply elements" meant too, but look at the examples OP gives in the question body. –  delnan Jul 10 '13 at 12:05
    
@InbarRose Why does the map(*zip) version not work? –  ersran9 Jul 10 '13 at 12:16
1  
@ersran9 You mean the map(mul, ...) one? mul takes two arguments, and—sadly—does not support passing a single iterable. –  poke Jul 10 '13 at 12:54
    
@poke Well, what I wanted to know was why map(mul, *zip(..)) wouldn't provide two arguments to mul instead of a tuple. –  ersran9 Jul 10 '13 at 12:58
    
@ersran9 *zip() only makes the return value of the whole zip expand into multiple arguments, so you are essentially calling map(mul, zip_0, zip_1, zip_2, ...) where each zip_i is still a tuple. –  poke Jul 10 '13 at 13:01
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In [88]: mylist = [1,2,3,4]

In [89]: sum(itertools.imap(lambda t: operator.mul(*t), itertools.izip(mylist, itertools.islice(mylist, 1, len(mylist)))))
Out[89]: 20
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A generator expression without any list slices/copies

>>> mylist = [1,2,3,4]
>>> sum(mylist[i-1] * j for i, j in enumerate(mylist) if i)
20
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