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I've got a page that has multiple instances of a form. Each form has, among its other fields, this field:

<input class="span1" type="text" name="abc" id="abc" value="25" placeholder="25"
       onfocus="if (this.value==this.defaultValue) this.value=''; else this.select()"
       onblur="if (!this.value) this.value=this.defaultValue"> 

The problem is that when I click in any instance of the above field, the focus gets put to the first occurrence of the field. this.select isn't being restricted to that specific element. How can I ensure that the JS of each field targets that field for its operations?

I'm pretty sure this is an elementary JS newb issue, but since I'm a JS newb... ;)

share|improve this question
    
Of course 30 seconds after posting I saw what I think the problem is: multiple identical id attributes. *facepalm* Checking to confirm... –  Sandwich Jul 10 '13 at 12:28
    
Well then if you have solved the problem delete this question before it get's down-voted –  Connor Jul 10 '13 at 12:30
    
Nope, that didn't solve it. :( –  Sandwich Jul 10 '13 at 12:47
    
Whats the issue –  Connor Jul 10 '13 at 12:51
    
"The problem is that when I click in any instance of the above field, the focus gets put to the first occurrence of the field." However, I figured out the issue and answer. Posting shortly. –  Sandwich Jul 10 '13 at 12:54

1 Answer 1

After reading the Quirksmode article on the subject, I realized that the problem was exactly what was being described there - the function was being referred instead of copied. From what I gathered, it's impossible to have inline JS work like I wanted for multiple instances on a single page.

My solution was to extract the JS from the HTML tags and make it into functions. I used some jQuery to do so (because jQuery!). :p

Here's the HTML:

<input
class="span1 hasDefaultValue"
type="text"
name="abc"
value="25"
placeholder="25">

And the JS:

<script type="text/javascript">
function fieldFocus()
{
    if (this.value==this.defaultValue)
    {
        this.value='';
    }
    else
    {
        this.select();
    }
}
function fieldBlur()
{
    if (!this.value)
    {
        this.value=this.defaultValue;
    }
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("input.hasDefaultValue").click(fieldFocus);
    $("input.hasDefaultValue").blur(fieldBlur);
});
</script>

I'm sure that can be made more streamlined, but I wanted to post the answer ASAP. I might update with a streamlined solution later.

share|improve this answer
    
...the function was being referred instead of copied." That doesn't make any sense. If you have several elements with inline handlers, they each get their own function. The section in that article on inline handlers deals with function calls, like onclick="doSomething()", where you won't get your expected this value. That doesn't have anything to do with your question. –  Crazy Train Jul 10 '13 at 13:13
    
...and that article's section on "copying" the function is misleading. Functions are never copied when assigned. They're always a reference to the same function. I think that article was trying to explain this in terms of function "ownership", but that's a really poor way to explain it since functions aren't owned. –  Crazy Train Jul 10 '13 at 13:15
    
Whatever it did, it led me to the solution that worked for me. *shrug* –  Sandwich Jul 10 '13 at 17:26

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