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1.  vector<string> cmdv=explode(" ","i am a string");
2.  std::string arg;
3.  char * args[10];
4.  for (i = 0; i < cmdv.size(); i++) {
5.      arg = std::string(cmdv[i]);
6.      if (cmdv[i][0] == '"') {
7.          //do some thing
8.      }
9.      args[i] = arg.c_str();;
10. }
11. args[i]='\0';

I expected the contents of args array {"i","am","a","string"} but args array is {"am","a","string","string"}

on debug i found that at line 6 in if clause when cmdv[i][0] is compared with '"', args[i-1] is being replaced with contents of arg. I got baffled!

there is no problem with explode function. Its working good.

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 10 '13 at 14:34

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i dont understand how comparision operation is affecting the contents of args array. any comparision operation with cmdv at that point is changing the args[i-1] –  neckTwi Jul 10 '13 at 8:19
    
I don't see why this deserved a downvote, except that perhaps it's more suited for stackoverflow than here perhaps. –  jcoder Jul 10 '13 at 8:21
    
please port it to stackoverflow then –  neckTwi Jul 10 '13 at 8:38
    
@JohnB I knew that scope of the variable ends at that point. but it appeared to be working. and i am still baffled y the contents changing at comparison not while assigning new string to arg? –  neckTwi Jul 10 '13 at 9:38
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a problem :-

args[i] = arg.c_str();

The pointer returned by this is only valid while arg contains it's value and you alter arg each time through your loop. If you want to store a C style pointer to the string you'll need to make a copy of it, maybe something like :-

args[i] = strdup(arg.c_str());

But remember to free it. Plus there is probably a better way to achive what you want than using C style strings anyway

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i didnt use strdup but i did args[i]=string(arg.c_str()).c_str() it didnt work. y? I'm assigning a new c type string r8? –  neckTwi Jul 10 '13 at 8:24
1  
You are creating a temporary string object there and then using c_str to get a pointer to the data stored inside it. The data it's pointing to will be destroyed at the end of the line when the temporary string is destructed. Because the data will likely still be in the memory location it may appear to work. Partly. Sometimes. Until that memory gets reused. –  jcoder Jul 10 '13 at 8:26
    
oh! thanq :D I knew that scope of the variable ends at that point. but it appeared to be working. and i am still baffled y the contents changing at comparison not while assigning new string to arg? –  neckTwi Jul 10 '13 at 8:32
1  
@neckTwi: Compiler optimization probably. You officially can't notice it any earlier. The debugger doesn't count. –  MSalters Jul 10 '13 at 13:02
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