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When I type this into the interpreter, calling 'y' seems to invoke the destructor?

class SmartPhone:
    def __del__(self):
       print "destroyed"

y = SmartPhone()
y  #prints destroyed, why is that?
y  #object is still there

Here is one run, output does not make sense to me.

C:\Users\z4>python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 10 2012, 23:31:26) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win
32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> class SmartPhone:
...     def __del__(self):
...        print "destroyed"
...
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> del y
destroyed
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01A7CBC0>
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01A7CBC0>
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01A7CBC0>
>>> del y
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> y
destroyed
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01A7CB98>
>>>

and another, calling 'del y' sometimes calls the destructor and sometimes doesn't

C:\Users\z4>python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 10 2012, 23:31:26) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win
32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> class SmartPhone:
...     def __del__(self):
...             print "destroyed"
...
>>>
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>>
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01B6CBE8>
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01B6CBE8>
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01B6CBE8>
>>> del y
>>> y
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'y' is not defined
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> y
destroyed
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01B6CC38>
>>> del y
>>> y
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'y' is not defined
>>>
share|improve this question
14  
Cannot duplicate. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 10 '13 at 15:02
1  
Can you post the actual output of the script? –  thegrinner Jul 10 '13 at 15:03
    
Are you sure it prints "destroyed" at this line and not at the end of the script? –  Dahaka Jul 10 '13 at 15:05
    
Looks like print is just off by a line in that example, which doesn't seem that odd. –  Slater Tyranus Jul 10 '13 at 15:11
    
Just type it in the exact order and you can replicate it. –  ppone Jul 10 '13 at 15:15

5 Answers 5

The output in question is replicated only in interactive shell.

In interactive session, additional variable _ exists, which refer to last value.

Using sys.getrefcount to inspect reference count:

>>> import sys
>>> class SmartPhone:
...     def __del__(self):
...        print "destroyed"
...
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> sys.getrefcount(y) # not printed, _ does not reference SmartPhone object yet.
2
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x000000000263B588>
>>> sys.getrefcount(y) # y printed, _ reference SmartPhone object.
3

2, 3 in above output should be 1, 2. They are printed that way, because getrefcount() increase reference count temporarily as mentioned in getrefcount documentation.


I changed SmartPhone as follow to make it easy to inspect what's going on.

>>> class SmartPhone(object):
...     def __init__(self, name):
...         self.name = name
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return super(SmartPhone, self).__repr__() + ' name=' + self.name
...     def __del__(self):
...        print "destroyed", self
...
>>> y = SmartPhone('first')
>>> del y # deleted immediately, because only "y" reference it.
destroyed <__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x00000000024FEFD0> name=first
>>> y = SmartPhone('second')
>>> y # at this time, _ reference to second y (y's reference count is now 2)
<__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x00000000024FEFD0> name=second
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x00000000024FEFD0> name=second
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x00000000024FEFD0> name=second
>>> del y # not deleted immediately, because _ reference it.
>>> y = SmartPhone('third') # _ still reference the second y, because nothing is printed.
>>> y # second y is deleted, because _ now reference the third y. (no reference to the second y)
destroyed <__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x00000000024FEFD0> name=second
<__main__.SmartPhone object at 0x000000000264A470> name=third
share|improve this answer
2  
Great answer! I had no idea that _ exists and can cause such trouble. I'm posting a different SmartPhone that I used for experimentation, but this is the answer everyone should click. –  tdelaney Jul 10 '13 at 15:59
3  
+1 Well explained –  Brian Jul 10 '13 at 16:22
2  
+1 Great answer! –  Paulo Bu Jul 10 '13 at 17:15

You must have reset the value of y in the same interpreter session, dropping the reference count on the original object to 0. Then, since the first object is not referenced, it gets destroyed, but the new object is referenced by y

>>> class SmartPhone:
...   def __del__(self):
...     print 'destroyed'
...
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> y
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x00000000021A5608>
>>> y = SmartPhone()
>>> y
destroyed
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x00000000021A5648>

Notice that the address of these two objects is different. The destroyed that is printed is when __del__ is called on the first instance at 0x00000000021A5608.

In your example, when you explicitly call del on the object reference, it may be destroyed instantly (if this was the only reference to the object and the GC found it immediately). When you do y = SmartPhone() the old object will likely not be destroyed immediately, but will be destroyed when the collector finds it and sees a reference count of 0. This usually happens almost immediately but can be delayed.

Your print 'destroyed' may be displayed immediately or it may display after 1 or more additional commands are executed in your session, but should happen fairly quickly.

share|improve this answer
    
In the second example I gave. Why did 'del y' not immediately call the destructor? –  ppone Jul 10 '13 at 15:22
    
Because there was likely a temporary reference to the object elsewhere that hadn't cleared, as @falsetru points out in his answer. –  Brian Jul 10 '13 at 15:26
2  
There is no such thing as "calling del on an object" in Python. As such, you cannot destroy an object instantly using del. What del does is to remove a name. That is, it removes one reference to an object. Then, when the garbage collector goes around and checks how many references each object has, if an object has zero references, it only then gets destroyed. Note that if you don't explicitly call the garbage collector, it is free to run whenever it wants, which could be right away or could be some time later. –  John Y Jul 10 '13 at 15:27
    
Reworded for clarification. I hadn't intended to imply that del operates on the actual object. –  Brian Jul 10 '13 at 15:37

I ran the same code but got a different result:

class SmartPhone:
    def __del__(self):
       print "destroyed"

y = SmartPhone()
del y
print y  #prints destroyed, why is that?

Output :

>>> 
destroyed

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:/Users/Kulanjith/Desktop/rand.py", line 7, in <module>
    print y  #prints destroyed, why is that?
NameError: name 'y' is not defined

actually del y does its job but you instead

>>> y = SmartPhone() # create object
>>> del y # delete's the object y, therefore no variable exist after this line executes
destroyed
>>> y = SmartPhone() # again creates a object as a new variable y
>>> y # since no __repr__ methods are define the outcome is normal
<__main__.SmartPhone instance at 0x01A7CBC0>
share|improve this answer

__del__ is not a destructor in the C++ sense. It is a method which is guaranteed to be run before object destruction, and after an object becomes capable of being garbage collected.

In CPython, this happens when the reference count reaches 0. Accordingly, if you reassign a value to the single variable holding an object with a __del__ method, that method of that object will be called shortly thereafter.

share|improve this answer

Expanding on @falsetru's answer, here's a SmartPhone that makes it easy to see what is happening.

myid = 0

class SmartPhone(object):
    def __init__(self):
        global myid
        self.myid = myid
        print("init %d" % self.myid)
        myid += 1
    def __del__(self):
        print("delete", self)
    def __repr__(self):
        return "repr %d" % self.myid
    def __str__(self):
        return "str %d" % self.myid

>>> 
>>> y=SmartPhone()
init 0
>>> # _ will hold a ref to y
... 
>>> 
>>> y
repr 0
>>> _
repr 0
>>> # del only decreases the ref count
... 
>>> del y
>>> _
repr 0
>>> # _ still refs 0
... 
>>> y=SmartPhone()
init 1
>>> # but now i reassign _ and 0 goes away
... 
>>> y
delete str 0
repr 1
>>> 
share|improve this answer

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