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I'm currently working with a device called a Fluke 5500A Multi-Product Calibration Device. I've written a small program in C# to interact with it and learn more about how it works but unfortunately SerialPort.DataReceived is giving me some very strange results. The program's not long so I'm going to post it in its entirety here:

class Program
{
    static public bool isExecuting = true;
    static private string serialCommand;
    static private string dataReceived;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SerialPortConnection serialPort = new SerialPortConnection();

        serialPort.OpenSerialConnection();

        while (isExecuting == true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter a command or type q to quit.");
            serialCommand = Console.ReadLine().ToUpper();

            if (serialCommand == "Q")
                isExecuting = false;
            else if (serialCommand == "CLEAR")
                Console.Clear();
            else
            {
                dataReceived = serialPort.WriteSerialConnection(serialCommand);
                Console.WriteLine(dataReceived);
            }
        }

        serialPort.CloseSerialConnection();
    }
}

}

And my SerialPortConnection class:

public class SerialPortConnection
{
    private SerialPort serialPort;
    private string dataReceived = "none";

    public SerialPortConnection(string comPort = "Com3", int baud = 9600, System.IO.Ports.Parity parity = System.IO.Ports.Parity.None, int dataBits = 8, System.IO.Ports.StopBits stopBits = System.IO.Ports.StopBits.One)
    {
        serialPort = new SerialPort(comPort, baud, parity, dataBits, stopBits);
    }

    public void OpenSerialConnection()
    {
        try
        {
            serialPort.Open();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.Write("\nError");
            Console.Write(e);
        }
    }

    public string WriteSerialConnection(string SerialCommand)
    {
        try
        {
            serialPort.Write(String.Format(SerialCommand + "\r"));
            dataReceived = serialPort.ReadExisting();
            return dataReceived;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.Write("\nError");
            Console.Write(e);
            return "Execution Unsuccessful";
        }
    }

    public void CloseSerialConnection()
    {
        try 
        {
            serialPort.Close();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.Write("\nError");
            Console.Write(e);
        }
    }
}

My problem currently is the output to the console looks something like this:

Enter a command or type q to quit.
*IDN?

Enter a command or type q to quit.
OUT 50V <-- Command input
*IDN? <-- Previous command echoed back
FLUKE,5500A,8030005,2.61+1.3+2.0+* <-- Data received from previous command
161>
Enter a command or type q to quit.
OPER
OUT 50V
162>
Enter a command or type q to quit.
STBY
OPER
163>
Enter a command or type q to quit.
*RST
STBY
164>
Enter a command or type q to quit.

The commands execute just fine but the output to the console appears to be the last command that was executed and whatever data was returned by that command. I don't know why this could be.

EDIT:

Thanks to Robert P's answer I implemented the following code:

            var received = "";
            bool isReading = true;
            while (isReading == true)
            {
                try
                {
                    received += serialPort.ReadExisting();
                    if (received.Contains('>'))
                        isReading = false;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {

                }
            }
            Console.WriteLine(received);
share|improve this question
    
The device is just echo-ing the commands back. But you are not checking for that, nor do you wait long enough to receive it. Your ReadExisting() call can never work correctly. Use ReadLine() instead to get ahead. –  Hans Passant Jul 10 '13 at 15:07
    
@HansPassant Thanks for the info but wouldn't it be easier just to have the thread sleep for a couple seconds and then try ReadExisting()? I didn't take into account the fact that it would need time. –  DanteTheEgregore Jul 10 '13 at 15:12
    
@HansPassant Assuming I did wait for long enough to receive it, what's the amount of time I should wait? Half a second? Two seconds? Maybe a tenth of a second? –  DanteTheEgregore Jul 10 '13 at 15:14
    
@HansPassant Also is there any way to stop the command echoes without trimming them off the string itself? Perhaps a property I can set to ignore them? Most likely not but it's worth asking. –  DanteTheEgregore Jul 10 '13 at 15:19
    
The fact that you are asking this ought to be a very strong hint that you should not never use sleep. It is very unreliable and just wastes time when you try to make it more reliable. Make ReadLine() work, change the SerialPort.NewLine property if necessary. –  Hans Passant Jul 10 '13 at 15:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One part of your problem is that serial communication is far from instantaneous. The .ReadExisting() method pulls data out of the SerialPort object's buffer, but does nothing to assure that the device has finished issuing its command. Think of it like this:

+----+            +----------+           +------------+
|Your|--Command-->|Serial    |---UART--->|    Device  |
|Code|            |Port Obj  |           |            |
+----+            +----------+           +------------+

+----+            +----------+           +------------+
|Your|<--Read-----|Serial    |           |Device      |
|Code| (is empty) |          |           |(processing)|
+----+            +----------+           +------------+

+----+            +----------+           +------------+
|Your|            |Serial    |<-response-|Device      |
|Code|            |(has data)|           |(responding)|
+----+            +----------+           +------------+

+----+            +----------+           +------------+
|Your|--Command2->|Serial    |---UART--->|    Device  |
|Code|            |(has data)|           |            |
+----+            +----------+           +------------+

+----+            +----------+           +------------+
|Your|<--Read-----|Serial    |           |Device      |
|Code| (previous  |          |           |(processing)|
+----+  response) +----------+           +------------+

Instead, look for a pattern, token, or other identifying mark to know that transmission is complete BEFORE sending the next command. Keep reading (expect timeouts - they're thrown as an exception!) until you know you have received the entire reply. In this case, it might be that the > character represents "ready for more input". You can interpret it to also mean "Response is complete."

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Added example code following your suggestion to my initial post. I appreciate the help. –  DanteTheEgregore Jul 10 '13 at 16:12

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