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I have a form with multiple input boxes that I'm trying to get to submit when I press the enter key, regardless of whether or not one of the inputs is currently highlighted. That is, I want to be able to enter text, click the background of the page, hit enter, and have the form submitted. I have tried making a hidden button, but this solution only appears to submit when the cursor is inside one of the inputs.

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2 Answers 2

Use onkeypress on document using pure javascript:

Fiddle.(demo)

JS:

var form = document.getElementById('form');
document.onkeypress = function(e) {
    if(e.keyCode === 13) //if enter pressed
    {
        form.submit();
    }

}

Here's another solution using addEventListener, as suggested by Matt:

var form = document.getElementById('form');
function submitForm(e) {
    if(e.keyCode === 13) //if enter pressed
    {
        form.submit();
    }

}

document.addEventListener('keypress', function() {submitForm(event)}, false);

As a side note: I would discourage you using jQuery on places where pure JS can help you easily that's why gave you a javascript solution. I would discourage that because jQuery increases the load on the server alot!

As you said you are new to javascript do the following steps to get your script running everytime:

  1. Add my code to a file with .js extension
  2. Add <script src="your_filename.js" type="text/javascript"></script> before your closing </body> tag.
  3. Refresh your page and voila.
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Good job on the Pure JavaScript answer. It might help some people to get to use the language instead of a bunch of libraries adding 15 Petabytes to your website. –  Jeff Noel Jul 10 '13 at 15:13
    
Thanks @JeffNoel :) –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Jul 10 '13 at 15:13
    
Upvote for no jQuery, but you should use addEventListener instead of setting the onkeypress attribute. –  Matt Bryant Jul 10 '13 at 15:15
    
Thanks @MattBryant, but why I should use eventListener when I just want the function to be executed only one on the document? –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Jul 10 '13 at 15:17
    
Among other reasons, setting the onkeypress attribute will overwrite anything that is already there, whereas you can have multiple eventlisteners attached to one element. For his case, it probably doesn't matter. In general however, it's the better method. –  Matt Bryant Jul 10 '13 at 15:23

With the help of jQuery:

$(document).keydown(function(e) {

    if (e.keyCode == 13) {

         $('#your-form').submit();

         return false;
    }

});
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why you copied mine? –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Jul 10 '13 at 15:10
2  
I'm sorry, we were posting it at the same time I guess! –  Pieter Jul 10 '13 at 15:14
1  
Answer is purely valid. And we all copied our knowledge from someone else's anyways. Questions like this usualy get 15 answers in 6 seconds, being all the same thing, but this is the jQuery alternative :) –  Jeff Noel Jul 10 '13 at 15:15
1  
OK @JeffNoel got it! –  Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Jul 10 '13 at 15:15
1  
I was checking my answer, so that took me 51 seconds more than yours. Take it easy, every user understands that copying is useless ;-) –  Pieter Jul 10 '13 at 15:20

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