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We all know that Firefox and Opera suck at handling tables. With the following code and css, my table displays perfectly on Chrome and Safari. On Firefox and Opera, the padding in the row where the items are displayed has almost tripled, which led to the overflow of 4 and a half items. The table looks terrible, to put it mildly.

HTML:

<div class= 'span10'>
<!--  <div class= 'span2'>-->                   
    <div class='photos'>
        <table cellspacing="0">
           <% @books.in_groups_of(9, false).shuffle.each do |books| %>                          
                <tr>
                    <% for book in books.shuffle %>
                        <td>
                            <%= link_to image_tag(book.image_url, :class => 'book') %>
                            <% if current_user.try(:admin?)  %>                                                 
                            <%= link_to 'Edit', edit_book_path(book) %> |
                            <%= link_to 'Destroy', video, method: :delete, data: { confirm: 'Are you sure?' } %>
                            <%= link_to 'New Book', new_book_path %>
                            <% else %>
                            <% end %>
                            <div class='hrline'><hr /></div>
                        </td>
                     <% end %> 
               </tr>
                  <% end %> 
       </table>                      
  </div>   
  <!-- </div> -->
</div>

CSS:

.photos  {
  width: 1600px;
  margin-left: 5px;
  padding: 5px;
  position: relative;
 }


.photos img {
  width: 128px;
  height: 194px;
  margin-left: -25px;
  padding: 5px;
  position: relative;
}

So, I dropped the table tag:

<div class= 'span10'>
<!--  <div class= 'span2'>  -->                   
    <div class='photos'>
        <!-- <table cellspacing="0"> -->
        <% @books.in_groups_of(9, false).shuffle.each do|books| %>                          
              <!--  <tr> -->
                 <% for book in books.shuffle %>
                    <!-- <td> -->
                    <%= link_to image_tag(book.image_url, :class => 'book') %>
                         <% if current_user.try(:admin?)  %>                                                 
                         <%= link_to 'Edit', edit_book_path(book) %> |
                         <%= link_to 'Destroy', video, method: :delete, data: {   confirm: 'Are you sure?' } %>
                         <%= link_to 'New Book', new_book_path %>
                         <% else %>
                         <% end %>
                        <div class='hrline'><hr /></div>
                    <!--  </td> -->
                        <% end %> 
               <!--  </tr> -->
         <% end %> 
    <!--</table>-->             
 </div>   
<!--</div>-->
</div>

and decided to use the popular flexbox and here is the styling I used:

.photos  {
  width: 1600px;
  margin-left: 5px;
  padding: 5px;
  position: relative;
  border-collapse:collapse;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  -webkit-flex-flow: column;
  -webkit-flex-align-items: baseline;
  -webkit-flex-direction: row;
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column;
  lex-align-items: baseline;
  flex-pack: distribute;
  flex-direction: row;
}

I was excited that, from what I read, this would end the nightmare. However, when I refreshed my page, the items (books in this case) displayed one item per row on all 4 browsers.

NB. I used unordered lists, as a variation to the above code, but that didn’t seem to help.

share|improve this question
3  
Template code is not useful, please provide the generated HTML. Opera and Firefox have no problem displaying tables. Flexbox is not a replacement for tables, either: tables are for tabular data. –  cimmanon Jul 10 '13 at 15:49
    
The code I submitted is the html code embedded with Ruby. I would submit the entire page source code, but Stackoverflow allows only a few characters when you make a comment. The generated code is no different: it just displays a bunch of rows of items. –  Adam Jul 10 '13 at 17:19
    
Right, you append your question with the generated code. It's a pain to go through and edit every single tag, especially when you consider that all you had to do was view source and paste the HTML. You could have gotten your answer hours ago. –  cimmanon Jul 10 '13 at 17:45
    
The generated code is even longer: what I submitted was the code included in the actual file and the part that is relevant to the issue. I don't know how anyone could debug without looking through the code. And to be honest with you, the issue is not in the html code, which is pretty straightforward ( <table><tr><td></td></tr></table> ), but rather in the styling. Two or more pairs of eyes are better than one. –  Adam Jul 10 '13 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally got to the bottom of this issue: it was the css as I thought all along.

So, I kept my table and with the help of the browser gem at: https://github.com/fnando/browser, I was able to serve a certain css to Firefox and Opera and another to Chrome and Safari and that took care of it beautifully. Here is how I did it:

<% if browser.firefox? || browser.opera? %>
     <div class='fire-photos'> //css for firefox and opera
<% else %> 
     <div class='photos'> //css for chrome and safari
<% end %>
        <table>
              <tr>
                  <td>
                  </td>
              </tr>
        </table>
    </div>
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