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We have two modules that get loaded (with 'define') by require.js:

  1. ds.test.js
  2. ds.js

As you might guess, the former tests the latter. The preamble to ds.test.js is as follows, with some console/logging I've added:

define(["ds", "test", "assert"], function (ds, test, assert) {
    console.log(arguments);
    // the rest is a 'pure' module -- 
    // no executable code outside of a returned object/map of methods

The output from the console/logging being what I expect: [Object, Object, Object]

The preamble (with console/logging) of ds.js is as follows:

define(["ds"], function (ds) {
    console.log(arguments);
    // the rest is a 'pure' module

The output from the console/logging however is: [undefined]

Why would the former (ds.test.js) be able to successfully load ds, but ds.js itself cannot? This causes one of my tests to fail, as one of the methods returned by ds refers to a method within itself, i.e.: 'ds.assoc()'. Interestingly before require.js we used a home-rolled dependency manager, and the test did not fail on the same method -- ds.js was able to refer to itself.

Would this be an issue of a so-called "circular dependency"? In that ds.test.js relies on ds.js, and ds.js relies on itself. If so how might I resolve my issue?

For what it's worth, ds.test.js gets loaded first -- it gets picked up as a global var named "SUITE" by 'test.runner.js', the preamble of which is as follows:

define(["test", SUITE], function (test, suite) {

Then whatever test suite gets loaded (in this cast, ds.test.js) in turn loads the module which it is testing (e.g. "ds")

Some final context is that I've just inherited this code in the last few weeks, and what I'm doing is based on our existing conversion of another application from our home-rolled dependency manager to require.js. So I guess I'm asking that be taken into consideration before any sniping with comments such as "why are you using a global variable"; if you've got suggestions for a concrete alternative, great I look forward to it.

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2  
If ds refers to a method within itself, couldn't you call your example function of assoc() directly, rather than try to use ds.assoc()? (This also eliminates the perceived need for ds to load itself.) –  Serlite Jul 10 '13 at 17:04
    
Your suggestion worked so make it an answer so I can up-vote it and accept it, so you can get the reputation points you deserve. The only caveat is that it works because the functions are not assigned with 'var' and therefore get hoisted, otherwise it might not work. So I'll still need to do some pretty thorough testing after I adjust my code-generator accordingly. Still, a great start, and a simple solution, which are usually the best. –  George Jempty Jul 10 '13 at 17:26
    
Glad I could help out! Good luck working with require.js, I'm still getting to know it better myself. –  Serlite Jul 10 '13 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(Comment added as an answer by request.)

If ds refers to a method within itself, couldn't you call your example function of assoc() directly, rather than try to use ds.assoc()? (This also eliminates the perceived need for ds to load itself.)

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Fortunately I've done an analysis of the code base I've inherited and nowhere is it using functions defined/assigned of the form "var myFunc = function(...." So, with care, my code generator ought to be able to get rid of all the self-references. Therefore since your answer works perfectly for me I will accept it at this point, but again I will comment for people who may refer to this answer in the future -- it could be problematic if the self-references are to functions defined/assigned in the "var myFunc = function(..." manner –  George Jempty Jul 10 '13 at 20:39

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