Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey guys, I'm working on a program for a university course that uses a method called get_line() to recursively calculate a list of successive locations to get from one point on a grid to another. When I run it, I get a stack overflow at the line of the last return statement in the method. I was wondering if I could someone else to look over the method, and see if anything looks totally wrong. the method is provided below:

Thank you for the help!

location is an object containing a row r and a column c.

private Vector<location> get_line(location from, location to) {
    location nextLoc = new location();
    Vector<location> loc = new Vector<location>();
    Random r = new Random();

    if(to.r == from.r && to.c == from.c) {
        return(loc);
    } else {
        if(to.r > from.r && to.c > from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
            nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
        } else if(to.r < from.r && to.c < from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
            nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
        } else if(to.r < from.r && to.c > from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
            nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
        } else if(to.r > from.r && to.c < from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
            nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
        } else if(to.r == from.r && to.c > from.c) {
            if(r.nextInt(2) == 0) {
                nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
            } else {
                nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
            }
            nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
        } else if(to.r == from.r && to.c < from.c) {
            if(r.nextInt(2) == 0) {
                nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
            } else {
                nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
            }
            nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
        } else if(to.r < from.r && to.c == from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
            if(r.nextInt(2) == 0) {
                nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
            } else {
                nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
            }
        } else if(to.r > from.r && to.c == from.c) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
            if(r.nextInt(2) == 0) {
                nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
            } else {
                nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
            }
        }

        loc.add(nextLoc);

        return(get_line(nextLoc,to)); //stack overflow error occurs here.
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You should retag this and add the homework tag, just to be more upfront about it. –  James Black Nov 18 '09 at 17:37
2  
It's customary in Java to give all classes names beginning with an upperclass character; location looked more like a variable to me than a class until I hit a mental segfault and went back to inspect it more closely. Never underestimate the power of convention! –  Andrzej Doyle Nov 18 '09 at 17:53
    
I wasn't aware that there was a homework tag, and how is that helpful to anyone trying to answer a question about programming? Additionally, the first sentence in my question is "Hey guys, I'm working on a program for a university course" –  seventeen Dec 2 '09 at 17:34
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, you are seeding your random generator every time you enter the method, move:

Random r = new Random();

to an attribute of the class.

Second, it looks like if your method returns, it will only return an empty Vector because you create a new one every time.

Third, you enumerate the 8 possible directions which makes the code more complex than it needs to be, try rewriting it handling the row and columns separately, like:

if (to.c == from.c && to.r == from.r) {
    // reached destination
    return;
}

if (to.c > from.c) {
    // move right
} else if (to.c < from.c) {
    // move left
} else {
    // random step left/right
}

if (to.r > from.r) {
    // move down
} else if (to.r < from.r) {
    // move up
} else {
    // random step up/down
}

// take next step

Edit: your algorithm as it is now can only reach the to location if the last step is diagonal. If your last step is horizontal you always veer off vertically and vise versa, so you will hover around the destination ad infinitum resulting in a stack overflow. A sossible solution would be to use nextInt(3) and not veer off one third of the time.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - The simplification would be key here, but he may want to have all the bases covered. It doesn't appear that Random r is being used, as to.r is different than just 'r'. –  James Black Nov 18 '09 at 17:47
    
He does use r to make random steps in r.nextInt(2) == 0 –  rsp Nov 18 '09 at 18:29
add comment

What is the condition that where these two parameters will be true:

if(to.r == from.r && to.c == from.c)

In my glancing through it appears that nextloc is always modified, so the statement above will never be true.

share|improve this answer
add comment

"to.r == from.r && to.c == from.c" never evaluates to true...

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you are getting a stack overflow, you probably have an infinite loop. In other words, your algorithm is never finding the "to" point. Try printing out the "nextLoc" value at the start of the method to see if it is making any progress towards getting to and from to match. Then you can try to figure out where your algorithm went wrong.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You have a recursive function here. That is a function that calls itself. Every time you make a method call you add a frame to the stack. If your recursive function does not exit in a reasonable number of recursions you will run out of stack space. Thus a stack overflow. As others have said it looks like one of your conditions is always false so you will infinitely recurse (that is until you run out of stack space). This is like an infinite loop except the hardware cannot handle it so it crashes instead of just working forever.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Increase your runtime stack size via -Xss http://forums.sun.com/thread.jspa?threadID=756468

share|improve this answer
    
yes, err, but in this case, it wouldn't help, the get_line method from above will fill up any stack of any size ;) –  Andreas_D Nov 18 '09 at 17:30
    
In general, increasing the runtime stack is iffy, since exhausting it is often a sign of infinite recursion. –  David Thornley Nov 18 '09 at 17:41
1  
Agree, you should only increase the stack if you can show that you exceed the stack depth in normal operation. This is clearly infinite recursion. –  Andrzej Doyle Nov 18 '09 at 17:51
    
Oh I agree too, but I have had recursive functions in threads that exhaust the stack. Increasing by just a little and still having issues often solidifies an infinite call. –  Xepoch Nov 18 '09 at 18:31
add comment

You may see the problem more easily if you simpify your code, it has needless duplication in it. Your rows and column manipulations can be independent

    if ( to.r > from.r ){
           nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
    } else if ( to.r < from.r) {
            nextLoc.r = from.r -1;
    }

    if ( to.c > from.c ){
           nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
    } else if ( to.c < from.c) {
            nextLoc.c = from.c -1;
    }

I find easier to understand than your equivalent:

    if(to.r > from.r && to.c > from.c) {
        nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
        nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
    } else if(to.r < from.r && to.c < from.c) {
        nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
        nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
    } else if(to.r < from.r && to.c > from.c) {
        nextLoc.r = from.r - 1;
        nextLoc.c = from.c + 1;
    } else if(to.r > from.r && to.c < from.c) {
        nextLoc.r = from.r + 1;
        nextLoc.c = from.c - 1;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.