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I am extending an existing C# application which uses SQLite database to be used on LAN. At most 1-4 PC's will be using it simultaneously. I am not a very experienced programmer and so need some expert advice on how to handle multiple write request to database. I know that SQLite is not made for client/server application. But my application does not have any heavy database usage. I want to take care that all the queries are processed properly. When SQLite tries to access a file that is locked by another process, the default behavior is to return SQLITE_BUSY.

In my code I am checking if the connection is busy then I am running a while loop to wait for some time and then call the openConnection() method recursively till the connection state changes from busy.

Is this the proper approach?

public bool OpenConnection()
{
   if (Con == null)
   {
      Con = new SQLiteConnection(ConnectionString);
   }

   if ((Con.State != ConnectionState.Open)&&(Con.State==ConnectionState.Broken || Con.State==ConnectionState.Closed))
   {
      Con.Open();

      Cmd = new SQLiteCommand("PRAGMA FOREIGN_KEYS=ON", Con);
      Cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
      Tr = Con.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted);
      return true;
   }

   if(IsConnectionBusy())
   {
      int count = 10000;
      while (count!=0)
      {
         count--;
      }
      OpenConnection();
   }
   return false;
}

public bool IsConnectionBusy()
{
   switch (Con.State)
   {
      case ConnectionState.Connecting:
      case ConnectionState.Executing:
      case ConnectionState.Fetching:
      return true;
   }
   return false;
}

 public Boolean CloseConnection()
        {
            if (Con != null && Con.State == ConnectionState.Open)
            {
                Tx.Commit();
                Con.Close();
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }




public Boolean ExecuteNonQuery(string sql)
        {
            if (sql == null) return false;
            try
            {
                if (!OpenConnection())
                    return false;
                else
                {
                    Cmd = new SQLiteCommand(sql, Con){Transaction = Tx};
                    Cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                    return true;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception exception)
            {
                Tx.Rollback();
                Msg.Log(exception);
                return false;
            }
            finally
            {
                CloseConnection();
                Cmd.Dispose();
            }
        }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Typically you could use a lock (mutex) to manage access to a shared resource. Only one thread can hold the lock at a time.

For example:

public class ConnectionClass
{
    private static object lockobj = new object();

    public Result ExecuteQuery(Query query)
    {
        // wait until the resource is available
        lock (lockobj)
        {
            // open connection, get results
        }
    }
}

There are two potential problems with the polling approach in the OP:

  1. By polling, you may cause a longer wait for the client than is necessary.
  2. It's exposed to a possible race condition, where two threads simultaneously see the connection as not busy, then both attempt to open it.

Using a mutex gets around these issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Multiple PCs on the network writing. –  Larry Lustig Jul 10 '13 at 17:35
    
Thanks for pointing out the possibility of race condition in my code. –  coding Jul 10 '13 at 17:46
    
I will use locks as suggested by you. Thanks. :-) –  coding Jul 10 '13 at 17:46
    
@McGarnagle Is there any possibility that the same thread can call the write function after the lock is released but still the lock from the database file is not released. –  coding Jul 10 '13 at 17:50

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